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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:郭珍霓 大小:qwFpqubz11838KB 下载:i3qLSLjQ36738次
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日期:2020-08-04 22:31:03
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  WHEREIN IS AGAINE DECLARED, THE GREAT INDISCRETION AND FOLLY OF
2.  DECLARING, THAT WISE AND VERTUOUS LADIES, OUGHT TO HOLD
3.  The Jew made answer, that he beleeved nothing to be so good andholy, as the Jewish Religion, and having beene borne therein, thereinalso he purposed to live and dye, no matter whatsoever being able toremove him from that resolution. For all this stiffe deniall,Jehannot would not so give him over; but pursued him still day byday, reitterating continually his former speeches to him: deliveringinfinite excellent and pregnant reasons, that Merchants themselveswere not ignorant, how farre the Christian faith excelled the Jewishfalshoods. And albeit the Jew was a very learned man in his owneLaw, yet notwithstanding the intire amity he bare to Jehannot, or(perhaps) his words fortified by the blessed Spirit, were soprevailant with him, that the Jew felt a pleasing apprehension inthem, though as yet his obstinacie stoode farre off from Conversion.But as he thus continued strong in opinion, so Jehannot lefte nothourely to labour him: insomuch, that the Jew being conquered bysuch earnest and continuall importunity, one day spake to Jehannot,saying.
4.  The friendly Merchant, and likewise the Ladie, hearing thesewords, wept both bitterly: and after hee had given over speaking,kindely they comforted him, with promises and solemne Vowes, that ifhee dyed, all should be performed which hee had requested. Within ashort while after, he departed out of this life, and they gave himverie honourable buriall, according to that Country custome. Whichbeing done, the Merchant dispatching all his affaires at Rhodes, wasdesirous to returne home to Cyprus, in a Carracke of the Catelans thenthere being: mooving the Ladie in the matter, to understand how sheestoode enclined, because urgent occasions called him thence to Cyprus.The Lady made answere, that shee was willing to passe thither withhim, hoping for the love hee bare to deceased Antiochus, that heewould respect her as his Sister. The Merchant was willing to giveher any contentment, but yet resolved her, that under the title ofbeing his Sister, it would be no warrant of securitie to them both.Wherefore, hee rather advised her, to stile him as her husband, and hewould terme her his Wife, and so hee should be sure to defend her fromall injuries whatsoever.
5.  But I have none, nor thinke I ever shall.
6.  Let me then tell you, that at Varlungo, which you know to bee notfarre distant hence, there dwelt an youthfull Priest, lustie, gallant,and proper of person (especially for Womens service) commonly calledby the name of sweet Sir Simon. Now, albeit he was a man of slenderreading, yet notwithstanding, he had store of Latine sentences byheart; some true, but twice so many maimed and false, Saint-likeshewes, holy speeches, and ghostly admonitions, which hee would preachunder an Oake in the fields, when he had congregated hisParishioners together. When women lay in childebed, hee was theirdaily comfortable visitant, and would man them from their houses, whenthey had any occasion to walke abroad: carrying alwaies a bottle ofholy water about him, wherewith he would sprinkle them by the way,peeces of halowed Candles, and Chrisome Cakes, which pleased womenextraordinarily, and all the Country affoorded not such anotherfrolicke Priest, as this our nimble and active sweet Sir Simon.

计划指导

1.  Never more shall thy falshoode me enfolde.
2.  When day appeared, and the violent stormes were more mildly appeasedthe Ladie, who seemed well-neere dead, lifted up her head, and began(weake as she was) to call first one, and then another: but sheecalled in vaine, for such as she named were farre enough from her.Wherefore, hearing no answere, nor seeing any one, she wondredgreatly, her feares encreasing then more and more. Raising her selfeso well as shee could, she beheld the Ladies that were of her company,and some other of her women, lying still without any stirring:whereupon, first jogging one, and then another, and calling themseverally by their names; shee found them bereft of understanding, andeven as if they were dead, their hearts were so quayled, and theirfeare so over-ruling, which was no meane dismay to the poore Ladyher selfe. Neverthelesse, necessity now being her best counsellor,seeing her selfe thus all alone, and not knowing in what place sheewas, shee used such meanes to them that were living, that (at thelast) they came to better knowledge of themselves. And being unable toguesse, what was become of the men and Marriners, seeing the Ship alsodriven on the sands, and filled with water, she began with them tolament most greevously: and now it was about the houre of mid day,before they could descry any person on the shore, or any els to pitythem in so urgent a necessity.
3.  BE REDUCED TO CIVILL OBEDIENCE
4.  The wise Gentlewoman replied, that she was well contented, inregard of the severe punishment inflicted on him by God Cupid, for thereproachfull speeches he had given her; to allow him so poore akinde of consolation, as he had requested her to grant him. WhereupponFriar Albert saide: Be ready then Madam to give him welcome tomorrow in the evening, at the entering into your house, for comming inan humane body, he cannot but enter at your doores: n e whereas, if(in powerfull manner) he made use of his wings, he then would Eye inat your window, and then you could not be able to see him.
5.  For now there wanted no costly dinners and suppers, with aldelicates could be devised, for the entertainement of Buffalmaco andBruno; who, like Guests very easie to be invited, where rich wines andgood cheare are never wanting, needed little sending for, becausehis house was as familiar to them, as their owne. In the end, when thePhysitian espyed an opportunitie apt for the purpose, he made the samerequest to Buffalmaco, as formerly hee had done to Bruno. WhereatBuffalmaco, sodainly starting, and looking frowningly on Bruno, asif he were extraordinarily incensed against him: clapping his handfuriously on the Table, he sayde. I sweare by the great God ofPasignano, that I can hardly refrayne from giving thee such a blowon the face, as should make thy Nose to fall at thy heeles: vileTraitor as thou art: for none beside thy selfe, could discover so rareand excellent a secret unto this famous Physitian. The Doctour, withvery plausible and pleasing tearmes, excused the matter verieartificially; protesting, that another had revealed it unto him: andafter many wise circumstantiall Allegations, at length hee prevailedso farre, that Buffalmaco was pacified; who afterwardes turning inkinde manner, thus hee beganne.
6.  At such time as Octavius Caesar (not as yet named Augustus, but onlyin the office called Triumveri) governed the Romane Empire, theredwelt in Rome a Gentleman, named Publius Quintus Fulvius, a man ofsingular understanding, who having one son, called Titus QuintusFulvius, of towardly yeares and apprehension, sent him to Athens tolearne Philosophy, but with letters of familiar commendations, to aNoble Athenian Gentleman, named Chremes, being his ancient friend, oflong acquaintance. This Gentleman lodged Titus in his owne house, ascompanion to his son, named Gisippus, both of them studyingtogether, under the tutoring of a Philosopher, called Aristippus.These two yong Gentlemen living thus in one Citty, House, and Schoole,it bred betweene them such a brother-hoode and amity, as they couldnot be severed from one another, but only by the accident of death;nor could either of them enjoy any content, but when they were bothtogether in company.

推荐功能

1.  Imprisonment had somwhat mishapen Jehannot in his outward forme, butnot impaired a jot of his noble spirit; much lesse the true love whichhe bare his friend. And although most earnestly he desired thatwhich now Conrado had so frankly offered him, and was in his poweronely to bestow on him; yet could he not cloud any part of hisgreatnes, but with a resolved judgement, thus replied. My Lord,affectation of rule, desire of welthy possessions, or any other matterwhatsoever could never make me a traitor to you or yours; but that Ihave loved, do love, and for ever shal love your beauteous daughter:if that be treason, I do free confesse it, and will die a thousanddeaths before you or any else shall enforce me to deny it, for Ihold her highly worthy of my love. If I have bin more unmannerlywith her then became me, I have committed but that error, whichevermore is so attendant uppon youth; that to deny, is to denieyouth also. And if reverend age would but remember, that once he wasyoung and measure others offences by his owne, they would not bethoght so great, as you (and many more) account them to be, mine beingcommitted as a friend, and not as an enemy. What you make offer ofso willingly, I have alwayes desired; and if I had thought it wouldhave beene granted, long since I had most humbly requested it: andso much the more acceptable would it have bin to me, by how much thefurther off it stood from my hopes. But if you bee so forward asyour words doe witnesse, then feed me not with any furtherfruitlesse expectation; but rather send me backe to prison, and lay asmany afflictions on me as you please. For my endeered love to yourdaughter Spina, maketh mee to love you the more for her sake, howhardly soever you intreat me; and bindeth me in the greaterreverence to you, as being the Father of my fairest friend.
2.  Messer Guiglielmo of Rossiglione having slaine Messer GuiglielmoGuardastagno, whom hee imagined to love his wife, gave her his heartto eate. Which she knowing afterward, threw her selfe out of an highwindow to the ground; and being dead, was then buried with her friend.
3.  IN JUST REPROOFE OF SUCH FOOLISH MEN, AS WILL BE GOVERNED BY
4.  These words pierced the heart of the King deepely, and so much themore afflicted him, because he knew them to be most true: wherefore,after he had ventred a very vehement sigh, thus he replyed. Beleeve menoble Count, there is not any enemy, how strong soever he be, but Ihold him weake and easie to be vanquished, by him who is skilfull inthe warre, where a man may learne to conquere his owne appetite. Butbecause he shall find it a laborious taske, requiring inestimablestrength and courage; your words have so toucht me to the quicke, thatit becommeth me to let you effectually perceive (and within thecompasse of few dayes) that as I have learned to conquer others, soI am not ignorant, in expressing the like power upon my selfe.Having thus spoken, within some few dayes after, the King beingreturned to Naples, he determined, as we to free himself from anythe like ensuing follie, as also to recompence Signior Neri, for thegreat kindnesse he had shewne to him (although it was a difficultthing, to let another enjoy, what he rather desired for himselfe) tohave the two Damosels married, not as the Daughters of Signior Neri,but even as if they were his owne. And by consent of the Father, hegave Genevera the faire, to Signior Maffeo da Palizzi, and Isottathe amiable, to Signior Gulielmo della Magna, two Noble Knights andhonourable Barons. After he had thus given them in marriage, in sadmourning he departed thence into Apuglia, where by following worthyand honourable actions, he so well overcame all inordinateappetites: that shaking off the enthraling fetters of love, he livedfree from all passions, the rest of his life time, and dyed as anhonourable King.
5.   LED AND GOVERNED BY IDLE PERSWASIONS
6.  Delights and pleasures, be they never so long in contenting andcontinuance, yet they come to a period and conclusion at last: SoZeppa, having ended his amorous combate, and over the head of hisperfidious friend, thought himselfe sufficiently revenged. But now, inconsideration of a further promise made on the bargaine;Spinelloccioes wife challengeth the jewel, then which kind ofrecompence, nothing can be more welcom to women. Heereupon, Zeppacalling for his owne wife, commanded her to open the Chest; which sheedid, and he merrily smiling, saide. Well wife, you have given mee aCake insted of bread, and you shal lose nothing for your labour. SoSpinelloccio comming forth of the Chest, it requireth a better wittethen mine, to tell you, which of them stood most confounded withshame, either Spinelloccio seeing Zeppa, and knowing well enoughwhat he had done: or the woman beholding her husband, who easily heardall their familiar conference, and the action thereupon sodeservedly performed.

应用

1.  "I will prove it so sufficiently," says he, that you shall all bethoroughly convinced. Gentlemen," says he, "by how much a family ismost ancient by so much it is most noble. The family of the Baronchiis the most ancient in Florence, ergo it is the most noble. I havenothing, then, to prove but the antiquity of the Baronchi. This willappear in that Prometheus made them at the time that he first began tolearn to paint, and made others after he was master of his art. Toconvince you of this, do but examine the figures of the one and theother: you'll find art and proportion in the composition of the one,whereas the others are but rough-drawn and imperfect. Among theBaronchi you'll meet with one with a long narrow face, another witha prodigiously broad one; one is flat-nosed, another has a nose thatmeasures an ell; one has a long chin and jaws like an ass, another hashis short and flat, and is monkey-faced. Nay, there are some of themthat have but one eye either larger or lower than the others have.In a word, their faces for all the world resemble such as childrenmake when they first begin to draw. Prometheus, you will allow, mustbe no great master when he made these figures, as I told you before;and consequently they must be more noble as they are more ancient."
2.  Let passe the wanton follies passing betweene them, and come toMadame Catulla, who finding it a fit and convenient time, to ventforth the tempest of her spleene, began in this manner. Alas! howmighty, are the misfortunes of women, and how ill requited is allthe loyall love of many wives to their husbands? I, a pooremiserable Lady, who, for the space of eight yeeres now fullycompleated, have loved thee: more dearely then mine owne life, findenow (to my hearts endlesse griefe) how thou wastest and consumestthy desires, to delight them with a strange woman, like a most vileand wicked man as thou art. With whom doest thou now imagine thy selfeto be? Thou art with her, whom thou hast long time deluded by falseblandishments, feigning to affect her, when thou doatest in thydesires else-where. I am thine owne Catulla, and not the wife ofRicciardo, trayterous and unfaithfull man, as thou art. I am sure thouknowest my voyce, and I thinke it a thousand yeeres, until wee may seeeach other in the light, to doe thee such dishonour as thou justlydeservest, dogged, disdainfull, and villainous wretch. By conceivingto have another woman in thy wanton embraces thou hast declared morejoviall disposition, and demonstrations of farre greater kindnesse,then domesticke familiarity. At home thou lookest sower, sullen orsurly, often froward, and seldome well pleased. But the best is,whereas thou intendest this husbandrie for another mans ground, thouhast (against thy will) bestowed it on thine owne, and the waterhath runne a contrary course, quite from the current where thoumeantst it.
3.  Calandrino, every minute ready to sinke under his weightieburthen, entred into his owne house, where (by great ill luck) hiswife, being a comely and very honest woman, and named Monna Trista,was standing aloft on the stayres head. She being somewhat angry forhis so long absence, and seeing him come in grunting and groaning,frowningly said. I thought that the divell would never let thee comehome, all the whole Citie have dined, and yet wee must remaine withoutour dinner. When Calandrino heard this, and perceived that he wasnot invisible to his Wife: full of rage and wroth, hee began to raile,saying. Ah thou wicked woman, where art thou? Thou hast utterly undoneme: but (as I live) I will pay thee soundly for it. Up the staireshe ascended into a small Parlour, where when he hadde spred all hisburthen of stones on the floore: he ran to his wife, catching frerby the haire of the head, and throwing her at his feete; giving her somany spurns and cruel blowes, as shee was not able to moove eitherarmes or legges, notwithstanding all her teares, and humblesubmission.
4、  THEIR HYPOCRISIE HONESTLY DISCOVERED
5、  Beleeve me Sir, the journey is over-farre for mee to undertake,but if it were neerer; I could affoord to goe in your Company; onelyto see how they make these Macherones, and to fill my belly with them.

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  • 邵彦鹏 08-03

      The ground-plot descending from those hils or mountaines, grew lesseand lesse by variable degrees, as wee observe at entering into ourTheaters, from the highest part to the lowest, succinctly to narrowthe circle by order. Now, concerning these ground-plottes or littleMeadowes, those which the Sun Southward looked on, were full of Vines,Olive-trees, Almond-trees, Cherry-trees, and Figge-trees, withdivers other Trees beside, so plentifully bearing fruites, as youcould not discerne a hands bredth of losse. The other Mountaines,whereon the Northerne windes blow, were curiously covered with smallThickets or Woods of Oakes, Ashes, and other Trees so greene andstraite, as it was impossible to behold fairer. The goodly plaine itselfe, not having any other entrance, but where the Ladies came in,was planted with Trees of Firre, Cipresse, Laurell, and Pines; sosingularly growing in formall order, as if some artificiall or cunninghand had planted them, the Sun hardly piercing through their branches,from the top to the bottome, even at his highest, or any part of hiscourse.

  • 拉登 08-03

      While matters went on in this successefull manner, although he couldnot chuse, but still he remembred his cruell Mistresse, and was verydesperately transported for her love, as coveting (above all thingselse) to see her once more; yet was he of such powerfull constancy, as7 whole yeeres together, he vanquished all those fierce conflicts. Buton a day it chanced he heard a song sung in Cyprus, which hehimselfe had formerly made, in honour of the love he bare to hisMistresse, and what delight he conceived, by being dayly in herpresence; whereby he gathered, that it was impossible for him toforget her, and proceeded on so desirously, as he could not live,except he had a sight of her once more, and therefore determined onhis returne to Florence. Having set all his affaires in due order,accompanied with a servant of his onely, he passed to Ancona, wherewhen he was arrived, he sent his Merchandises to Florence, in nameof the Merchant of Ancona, who was his especiall friend and partner;travayling himselfe alone with his servant, in the habite of aPilgrime, as if he had beene newly returned from Jerusalem.

  • 魏忠贤 08-03

       But frailtie in our feminine sex is too much prevalent, and makes uswander from vertuous courses, when we are wel onward in the way tothem. Madam Beatrix, whatsoever passed betweene her and Anichino, Iknow not, but, either to continue this new begunne league forfurther time, or, to be revenged on her husbands implicity, inover-rashlie giving credit to so smooth a ly; this was her advise tohim. Anichino, quoth she, Take a good Cudgell in thy hand, then gointo the Garden so farre as the Pine; and there, as if formerly thouhadst solicited mee unto this secret meeting, only but by way ofapproving my honestie: in my name, revile thy master so bitterly asthou canst, bestowing manie sound blowes on him with thy cudgel; yeturge the shame stil (as it were) to mee, and never leave him, til thouhast beaten him out of the garden, to teach him keepe his bedanother time Such an apt Scholler as Anichino was in this kind,needs no tutoring, but a word is enough to a ready Wit. To theGarden goes he, with a good willow cudgell in his hand, and commingneere to the Pine-tree, there he found Egano disguised like to hisLady, who arising from the place where he sate, went with chearefullgesture to welcome him; but Anichino (in rough and stearne manner)thus spake unto him. Wicked shamelesse, and most immodest Woman, Artthou come, according to thine unchaste and lascivious promise?Couldest thou so easily credite, (though I tempted thee, to trie thevertue of thy continencie) I would offer such a damnable wrong to myworthy Master, that so deerely loves me, and reposeth his especiallconfidence in me? Thou art much deceived in me, and shalt finde,that I hate to be false to him.

  • 卢氏 08-03

      Madame, quoth the Countesse, most heartily I thanke you. Butbefore I presume any further on your kindnesse, let me first tell you,what faithfully I intend to do for you, if I can bring my purpose toeffect. I see that your daughter is beautifull, and of sufficientyeeres for marriage; and is debarred thereof (as I have heard) onelyby lack of a competent dowry. Wherefore Madame, in recompence of thefavour I expect from you, I will enrich her with so much ready moneyas you shall thinke sufficient to match her in the degree of honour.Poverty made the poore Lady, very well to like of such a bountifulloffer, and having a noble heart shee said: Great Countesse say,wherein am I able to do you any service, as can deserve such agracious offer? If the action be honest; without blame or scandallto my poore, yet undetected reputation, gladly I will do it; and itbeing accomplished, let the requitall rest in your owne noble nature.

  • 许会增 08-02

    {  WORTHY OF ANY HONOR OR RESPECT

  • 申毅 08-01

      Then turning her selfe to them, thus she proceeded. If your desirebe to joyne in honourable marriage, I am well contented therewith, andyour nuptials shall here be solemnized at my Husbands charges.Afterward both he and I will endeavour, to make peace betweene you andyour discontented Parents. Pedro was not a little joyfull at her kindeoffer, and Angelina much more then he; so they were married togetherin the Castle, and worthily feasted by the Lady, as Forrestentertainment could permit, and there they enjoyed the first fruits oftheir love. Within a short while after, the Lady and they (wellmounted on Horsebacke, and attended with an honourable traine)returned to Rome; where her Lord Liello and she prevailed so well withPedroes angry Parents: that the variance ended in love and peace,and afterward they lived lovingly together, till old age made themas honourable, as their true and mutuall affection formerly had done.}

  • 戎耀 08-01

      Mithridanes envying the life and liberality of Nathan, andtravelling thither, with a setled resolution to kill him: chaunceth toconferre with Nathan unknowne. And being instructed by him, in whatmanner he might best performe the bloody deede, according as heegave direction, hee meeteth with him in a small Thicket or Woode,where knowing him to be the same man, that taught him how to take awayhis life: Confounded with shame, hee acknowledgeth his horribleintention, and becommeth his loyall friend.

  • 秦博勇 08-01

      A LIVELY DEMONSTRATION, THAT THE BEAUTY OF A WOMAN (OFTENTIMES)

  • 克莱夫·帕尔默 07-31

       And yet when all things are confest,

  • 官程东 07-29

    {  The Jew mounted on horse-backe, and made no lingering in his journeyto Rome; where being arrived, he was very honourably entertained byother Jewes dwelling in Rome. And during the time of his abiding there(without revealing to any one the reason of his comming thither)very heedfully he observed the maner of the Popes life, of theCardinals, Prelates, and all the Courtiers. And being a man verydiscreet and judicious, hee apparantly perceived, both by his owneeye, and further information of friends; that from the highest tothe lowest (without any restraint, remorse of conscience, shame, orfeare of punishment) all sinned in abhominable luxurie, and notnaturally onely, but in foule Sodomie, so that the credite ofStrumpets and Boyes was not small, and yet might be too easilyobtayned. Moreover, drunkards, belly-Gods, and servants of the paunch,more then of any thing else (even like brutish beasts after theirluxury) were every where to be met withall. And upon furtherobservation, hee saw all men so covetous and greedie of Coyne, thatevery thing was bought and solde for ready money, not onely theblood of men, but (in plaine termes) the faith of Christians, yea, andmatters of divinest qualities, how, or to whomsoever appertaining,were it for Sacrifices or Benefices, whereof was made no meanmerchandize, and more Brokers were there to be found (then in Parisattending upon all Trades) of manifest Symonie, under the nice name ofNegotiation, and for gluttony, not sustentation: even as if God hadnot knowne the signification of vocables, nor the intentions of wickedhearts, but would suffer himselfe to bee deceived by the outward namesof things, as wretched men commonly use to doe.

  • 卜瑜 07-29

      Spirit, that walkst thus in the night,

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