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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:朱天红 大小:mGDLX9Uc53885KB 下载:KK5ejzNA20395次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:o5Ttwodg67023条
日期:2020-08-05 21:34:54
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刘文军

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Penelope was moved still more deeply as she heard the indisputableproofs that Ulysses laid before her; and when she had again foundrelief in tears she said to him, "Stranger, I was already disposedto pity you, but henceforth you shall be honoured and made welcomein my house. It was I who gave Ulysses the clothes you speak of. Itook them out of the store room and folded them up myself, and Igave him also the gold brooch to wear as an ornament. Alas! I shallnever welcome him home again. It was by an ill fate that he ever setout for that detested city whose very name I cannot bring myselfeven to mention."
2.  Then Alcinous told Laodamas and Halius to dance alone, for there wasno one to compete with them. So they took a red ball which Polybus hadmade for them, and one of them bent himself backwards and threw itup towards the clouds, while the other jumped from off the groundand caught it with ease before it came down again. When they haddone throwing the ball straight up into the air they began to dance,and at the same time kept on throwing it backwards and forwards to oneanother, while all the young men in the ring applauded and made agreat stamping with their feet. Then Ulysses said:
3.  And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.
4.  "But Polyphemus shouted to them from inside the cave, 'Noman iskilling me by fraud! Noman is killing me by force!'
5.  "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."
6.  In the end he deemed it best to take to the woods, and he foundone upon some high ground not far from the water. There he creptbeneath two shoots of olive that grew from a single stock- the onean ungrafted sucker, while the other had been grafted. No wind,however squally, could break through the cover they afforded, norcould the sun's rays pierce them, nor the rain get through them, soclosely did they grow into one another. Ulysses crept under theseand began to make himself a bed to lie on, for there was a greatlitter of dead leaves lying about- enough to make a covering for twoor three men even in hard winter weather. He was glad enough to seethis, so he laid himself down and heaped the leaves all round him.Then, as one who lives alone in the country, far from any neighbor,hides a brand as fire-seed in the ashes to save himself from having toget a light elsewhere, even so did Ulysses cover himself up withleaves; and Minerva shed a sweet sleep upon his eyes, closed hiseyelids, and made him lose all memories of his sorrows.

计划指导

1.  The maids looked at one another and laughed, while pretty Melanthobegan to gibe at him contemptuously. She was daughter to Dolius, buthad been brought up by Penelope, who used to give her toys to playwith, and looked after her when she was a child; but in spite of allthis she showed no consideration for the sorrows of her mistress,and used to misconduct herself with Eurymachus, with whom she was inlove.
2.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said. First theywashed and put their shirts on, while the women got ready. ThenPhemius took his lyre and set them all longing for sweet song andstately dance. The house re-echoed with the sound of men and womendancing, and the people outside said, "I suppose the queen has beengetting married at last. She ought to be ashamed of herself for notcontinuing to protect her husband's property until he comes home."
3.  'Son-in-law and daughter," replied Autolycus, "call the childthus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in oneplace and another, both men and women; so name the child 'Ulysses,' orthe child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother'sfamily on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him apresent and will send him on his way rejoicing."
4.  So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."
5.  "Good heavens, this voyage of Telemachus is a very serious matter;we had made sure that it would come to nothing, but the young fellowhas got away in spite of us, and with a picked crew too. He will begiving us trouble presently; may Jove take him before he is fullgrown. Find me a ship, therefore, with a crew of twenty men, and Iwill lie in wait for him in the straits between Ithaca and Samos; hewill then rue the day that he set out to try and get news of hisfather."
6.  "When I had got the men together I said to them, 'You think youare about to start home again, but Circe has explained to me thatinstead of this, we have got to go to the house of Hades andProserpine to consult the ghost of the Theban prophet Teiresias.'

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1.  "'Stay where you are, then, 'answered I, 'eating and drinking at theship, but I must go, for I am most urgently bound to do so.'
2.  "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."
3.  Another said, "I hope he may be no more successful in other thingsthan he is likely to be in stringing this bow."
4.  "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."
5.   "I am by birth a Cretan; my father was a well-to-do man, who hadmany sons born in marriage, whereas I was the son of a slave whom hehad purchased for a concubine; nevertheless, my father Castor son ofHylax (whose lineage I claim, and who was held in the highest honouramong the Cretans for his wealth, prosperity, and the valour of hissons) put me on the same level with my brothers who had been born inwedlock. When, however, death took him to the house of Hades, his sonsdivided his estate and cast lots for their shares, but to me they gavea holding and little else; nevertheless, my valour enabled me to marryinto a rich family, for I was not given to bragging, or shirking onthe field of battle. It is all over now; still, if you look at thestraw you can see what the ear was, for I have had trouble enoughand to spare. Mars and Minerva made me doughty in war; when I hadpicked my men to surprise the enemy with an ambuscade I never gavedeath so much as a thought, but was the first to leap forward andspear all whom I could overtake. Such was I in battle, but I did notcare about farm work, nor the frugal home life of those who wouldbring up children. My delight was in ships, fighting, javelins, andarrows- things that most men shudder to think of; but one man likesone thing and another another, and this was what I was mostnaturally inclined to. Before the Achaeans went to Troy, nine timeswas I in command of men and ships on foreign service, and I amassedmuch wealth. I had my pick of the spoil in the first instance, andmuch more was allotted to me later on.
6.  They threw their spears as he bade them, but Minerva made them allof no effect. One hit the door post; another went against the door;the pointed shaft of another struck the wall; and as soon as theyhad avoided all the spears of the suitors Ulysses said to his own men,"My friends, I should say we too had better let drive into themiddle of them, or they will crown all the harm they have done us byus outright."

应用

1.  Then Menelaus said, "All that you have been saying, my dear wife, istrue. I have travelled much, and have had much to do with heroes,but I have never seen such another man as Ulysses. What endurance too,and what courage he displayed within the wooden horse, wherein all thebravest of the Argives were lying in wait to bring death anddestruction upon the Trojans. At that moment you came up to us; somegod who wished well to the Trojans must have set you on to it andyou had Deiphobus with you. Three times did you go all round ourhiding place and pat it; you called our chiefs each by his own name,and mimicked all our wives -Diomed, Ulysses, and I from our seatsinside heard what a noise you made. Diomed and I could not make up ourminds whether to spring out then and there, or to answer you frominside, but Ulysses held us all in check, so we sat quite still, allexcept Anticlus, who was beginning to answer you, when Ulysses clappedhis two brawny hands over his mouth, and kept them there. It wasthis that saved us all, for he muzzled Anticlus till Minerva tookyou away again."
2.  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.
3.  "'Do not,' they exclaimed, 'be mad enough to provoke this savagecreature further; he has thrown one rock at us already which droveus back again to the mainland, and we made sure it had been thedeath of us; if he had then heard any further sound of voices he wouldhave pounded our heads and our ship's timbers into a jelly with therugged rocks he would have heaved at us, for he can throw them along way.'
4、  Then Telemachus spoke, "Shameless," he cried, "and insolent suitors,let us feast at our pleasure now, and let there be no brawling, for itis a rare thing to hear a man with such a divine voice as Phemius has;but in the morning meet me in full assembly that I may give you formalnotice to depart, and feast at one another's houses, turn and turnabout, at your own cost. If on the other hand you choose to persist inspunging upon one man, heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon withyou in full, and when you fall in my father's house there shall beno man to avenge you."
5、  "Telemachus, insolent braggart that you are, how dare you try tothrow the blame upon us suitors? It is your mother's fault not ours,for she is a very artful woman. This three years past, and close onfour, she has been driving us out of our minds, by encouraging eachone of us, and sending him messages without meaning one word of whatshe says. And then there was that other trick she played us. She setup a great tambour frame in her room, and began to work on an enormouspiece of fine needlework. 'Sweet hearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeeddead, still do not press me to marry again immediately, wait- for Iwould not have skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havecompleted a pall for the hero Laertes, to be in readiness againstthe time when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the womenof the place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.'

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  • 程国清 08-04

      "I also saw fair Epicaste mother of king OEdipodes whose awful lotit was to marry her own son without suspecting it. He married herafter having killed his father, but the gods proclaimed the wholestory to the world; whereon he remained king of Thebes, in great grieffor the spite the gods had borne him; but Epicaste went to the houseof the mighty jailor Hades, having hanged herself for grief, and theavenging spirits haunted him as for an outraged mother- to his ruingbitterly thereafter.

  • 文欧恺 08-04

      "My friends," said he, "this voyage of Telemachus's is a veryserious matter; we had made sure that it would come to nothing. Now,however, let us draw a ship into the water, and get a crew together tosend after the others and tell them to come back as fast as they can."

  • 袁华 08-04

       And Ulysses said, "Nausicaa, daughter of great Alcinous, may Jovethe mighty husband of Juno, grant that I may reach my home; so shall Ibless you as my guardian angel all my days, for it was you who savedme."

  • 张春晓 08-04

      She went straight to the beautifully decorated bedroom in whichthere slept a girl who was as lovely as a goddess, Nausicaa,daughter to King Alcinous. Two maid servants were sleeping near her,both very pretty, one on either side of the doorway, which wasclosed with well-made folding doors. Minerva took the form of thefamous sea captain Dymas's daughter, who was a bosom friend ofNausicaa and just her own age; then, coming up to the girl's bedsidelike a breath of wind, she hovered over her head and said:

  • 陈厝 08-03

    {  "It shall not be so, Eurymachus," said Antinous, "and you know ityourself. To-day is the feast of Apollo throughout all the land; whocan string a bow on such a day as this? Put it on one side- as for theaxes they can stay where they are, for no one is likely to come to thehouse and take them away: let the cupbearer go round with his cups,that we may make our drink-offerings and drop this matter of thebow; we will tell Melanthius to bring us in some goats to-morrow-the best he has; we can then offer thigh bones to Apollo the mightyarcher, and again make trial of the bow, so as to bring the contest toan end."

  • 张世恩 08-02

      "'You will now come to the Thrinacian island, and here you willsee many herds of cattle and flocks of sheep belonging to the sun-god-seven herds of cattle and seven flocks of sheep, with fifty head ineach flock. They do not breed, nor do they become fewer in number, andthey are tended by the goddesses Phaethusa and Lampetie, who arechildren of the sun-god Hyperion by Neaera. Their mother when shehad borne them and had done suckling them sent them to theThrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and lookafter their father's flocks and herds. If you leave these flocksunharmed, and think of nothing but getting home, you may yet aftermuch hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harm them, then I forewarnyou of the destruction both of your ship and of your comrades; andeven though you may yourself escape, you will return late, in badplight, after losing all your men.'}

  • 岳文涵 08-02

      Melanthius lit the fire, and set a seat covered with sheep skinsbeside it. He also brought a great ball of lard from what they hadin the house, and the suitors warmed the bow and again made trial ofit, but they were none of them nearly strong enough to string it.Nevertheless there still remained Antinous and Eurymachus, who werethe ringleaders among the suitors and much the foremost among themall.

  • 郭云飞 08-02

      "Be off, old man," he cried, "from the doorway, or you shall bedragged out neck and heels. Do you not see that they are all giving methe wink, and wanting me to turn you out by force, only I do notlike to do so? Get up then, and go of yourself, or we shall come toblows."

  • 张庆珍 08-01

       "I am by birth a Cretan; my father was a well-to-do man, who hadmany sons born in marriage, whereas I was the son of a slave whom hehad purchased for a concubine; nevertheless, my father Castor son ofHylax (whose lineage I claim, and who was held in the highest honouramong the Cretans for his wealth, prosperity, and the valour of hissons) put me on the same level with my brothers who had been born inwedlock. When, however, death took him to the house of Hades, his sonsdivided his estate and cast lots for their shares, but to me they gavea holding and little else; nevertheless, my valour enabled me to marryinto a rich family, for I was not given to bragging, or shirking onthe field of battle. It is all over now; still, if you look at thestraw you can see what the ear was, for I have had trouble enoughand to spare. Mars and Minerva made me doughty in war; when I hadpicked my men to surprise the enemy with an ambuscade I never gavedeath so much as a thought, but was the first to leap forward andspear all whom I could overtake. Such was I in battle, but I did notcare about farm work, nor the frugal home life of those who wouldbring up children. My delight was in ships, fighting, javelins, andarrows- things that most men shudder to think of; but one man likesone thing and another another, and this was what I was mostnaturally inclined to. Before the Achaeans went to Troy, nine timeswas I in command of men and ships on foreign service, and I amassedmuch wealth. I had my pick of the spoil in the first instance, andmuch more was allotted to me later on.

  • 马冬根 07-30

    {  "The men were in despair at this, and Eurylochus at once gave mean insolent answer. 'Ulysses,' said he, 'you are cruel; you are verystrong yourself and never get worn out; you seem to be made of iron,and now, though your men are exhausted with toil and want of sleep,you will not let them land and cook themselves a good supper upon thisisland, but bid them put out to sea and go faring fruitlessly onthrough the watches of the flying night. It is by night that the windsblow hardest and do so much damage; how can we escape should one ofthose sudden squalls spring up from South West or West, which so oftenwreck a vessel when our lords the gods are unpropitious? Now,therefore, let us obey the of night and prepare our supper here hardby the ship; to-morrow morning we will go on board again and put outto sea.'

  • 李琰 07-30

      "And I saw Sisyphus at his endless task raising his prodigious stonewith both his hands. With hands and feet he' tried to roll it up tothe top of the hill, but always, just before he could roll it overon to the other side, its weight would be too much for him, and thepitiless stone would come thundering down again on to the plain.Then he would begin trying to push it up hill again, and the sweat ranoff him and the steam rose after him.

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