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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:于小伟 大小:1d4mhNUd46800KB 下载:COnFl0Ko39127次
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日期:2020-08-06 09:23:35
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曹莉莉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  She continuing in these wofull lamentations, and the Marinerslabouring all in vaine, because the violence of the tempestencreased more and more, so that every moment they expectedwracking: they were carried (contrary to their owne knowledge) veryneere unto the Isle of Rhodes, which they being no way able toavoyd, and utterly ignorant of the Coast; for safety of their lives,they laboured to land there if possibly they might. Wherein Fortunewas somewhat furtherous to them, driving them into a small gulfe ofthe Sea, whereinto (but a little while before) the Rhodians, from whomChynon had taken Iphigenia, were newly entred with their ship. Nor hadthey any knowledge each of other, till the breake of day (which madethe heavens to looke more clearly) gave them discovery of being withina flight shoote together. Chynon looking forth, and espying the sameship which he had left the day before, hee grew exceedingsorrowfull, as fearing that which after followed, and therefore heewilled the Mariners, to get away from her by all their best endeavour,and let fortune afterward dispose of them as she pleased; for into aworse place they could not come, nor fall into the like danger.
2.  Thus parted Signior Thorello and his friends, from Saladine andhis company, who verily determined in the heighth of his minde, ifhe should be spared with life, and the warre (which he expected)concluded: to requite Thorello with no lesse courtesie, then hee hadalready declared to him; conferring a long while after with hisBaschaes, both of him and his beauteous Lady, not forgetting any oftheir courteous actions, but gracing them all with deservedcommendation. But after they had (with very laborious paines) surveyedmost of the Westerne parts, they all tooke Shipping, and returned intoAlexandria: sufficiently informed, what preparation was to be made fortheir owne defence. And Signior Thorello being come backe againe toPavia, consulted with his privat thoughts (many times after) whatthese three travailers should be, but came farre short of knowingthe truth, till (by experience) hee became better informed.
3.  But onely death. Grant then that I may die,
4.  Having thus agreed upon this conclusion, and had many merry meetingstogether: one night above the rest, when Frederigo was appointed tosuppe with Monna Tessa, who had made ready two fat Capons, drest inmost dainty and delicate manner: it fell out so unfortunately, thatJohn (whose Kue was not to come that night) came thither very late,yet before Frederigo, wherewith she being not a little offended,gave John a slight supper, of Lard, Bacon, and such like coarseprovision, because the other was kept for a better guest. In the meanetime, and while John was at supper, the Maide (by her Mistressesdirection) had conveighed the two Capons, with boyled Eggs, Breadand a Bottle of Wine (all folded up in a faire cleane table cloth)into her Garden, that a passage to it, without entering into thehouse, and where shee had divers times supt with Frederigo. Shefurther willed the Maide, to set all those things under a Peachtree, which adjoyned to the fields side: but, so angry she was ather husbands unexpected comming, that shee forgot to bid her tarriethere, till Frederigoes comming, and to tell him of Johns being there:as also, to take what he found prepared readie for his Supper.
5.  Holy Father, I am halfe ashamed to tell you the truth in thiscase, as fearing least I should sinne in vaine-glory. Whereto theConfessor replyed; Speake boldly sonne, and feare not, for intelling the truth, bee it in confession or otherwise, a man cannever sinne. Then sayde Maister Chappelet, Father, seeing you giveme so good an assurance, I will resolve you faithfully heerein. I amso true a Virgin-man in this matter, even as when I issued forth of mymothers Wombe. O sonne (quoth the Friar) how happy and blessed ofGod art thou? Well hast thou lived, and therein hast thou not meanlymerited, having had so much libertie to doe the contrary if thouwouldest, wherein verie few of us can so answer for our selves.
6.  Credulano, being as credulous as his name imported, seemed readyto swoune with sodaine conceit: Alas good wife (quoth he) how hapnedthis? Sit downe sweet Husband said she, and I wil tell you al. Ourchild was sodainly taken with a swouning, wherein I being unskilful,did verily suppose him to be dead, not knowing what to doe, or say. Bygood hap, our Gossip Reynard came in, and taking the childe up inhis armes, said to me. Gossip, this is nothing else but Wormes inthe bellie of the childe, which ascending to the heart, must needskill the child, without all question to the contrary. But be of goodcomfort Gossip, and feare not, for I can charme them in such sort,that they shall all die, and before I depart hence, you shall see yourSon as healthfull as ever. And because the maner of this charm is ofsuch nature, that it required prayer and exorcising in two places atonce: Nurse went up with his Holye Brother into our Pigeon loft, toexercise their devotion there, while we did the like heere. For nonebut the mother of the childe must bee present at such a mystery, norany enter to hinder the operation of the charme; which was thereason of making fast the Chamber doore. You shall see Husband anonthe Childe, which is indifferently recovered in his armes, and ifNurse and his holy Brother were returned from theyr meditations; hesaith, that the charme would then be fully effected: for the childbeginneth to looke chearefull and merry.

计划指导

1.  Poore Martellino was in a pittifull case, crying out for mercy,but no man would heare him; for, the more he cryed, the more stillthey did beat him, as meaning to leave no life in him: which Stechioand Marquiso seeing, considered with themselves, that they werelikewise in a desperate case; and therefore, fearing to be as muchmisused, they cryed out among the rest, Kill the counterfet knave, layon loade, and spare him not; neverthelesse, they tooke care how to gethim out of the peoples handes, as doubting, least they would killhim indeede, by their extreame violence.
2.  THE SECOND DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL
3.  Setting sayle thence, they arrived in Calabria, and then theregrew a great contention betweene them, to which of them this bootyof beauty should belong, because each of them pleaded a title toher. But when they could not grow to any agreement, but doubtedgreater disasters would ensue thereon, by breaking their former leagueof friendship: by an equall conformity in consent, they resolved, tobestow her as a rich present, on Frederigo King of Sicille, who wasthen young and joviall, and could not be pleased with a better gift;wherefore, they were no sooner landed at Palermo, but they didaccording as they had determined. The King did commend her beautyextraordinarily, and liked her farre beyond all his other Loves:but, being at that time empaired in his health, and his body muchdistempered by ill dyet; he gave command, that untill he should bein more able disposition, she must be kept in a goodly house of hisowne, erected in a beautifull Garden, called the Cube, where she wasattended in most pompous manner.Now grew the noyse and rumor great in Ischia, about this rape orstealing away of Restituta; but the chiefest greevance of all, was,that it could not be knowne how, by whom, or by what meanes. But Guiondi Procida, whom this injury concerned much more then any other: stoodnot in expectation of better tydings from Ischia, but h earing whatcourse the Barke had taken, made ready another, to follow after withall possible speede. Flying thus on the winged winds through the Seas,even from Minerva, unto the Scalea in Calabria, searching for his lostLove in every angle: at length it was told him at the Scalea, thatshee was carryed away by certaine Sicillian Marriners, to Palermo,whither Guion set sayle immediately.
4.  By a fountaines side:
5.  When he had ended these words, hee turned to Lisana, saying: Heeredoe I freely give over all further fruits of your affection towardsme, thanking you for your former love: so taking her head betweene hishands he kissed her faire forhead, which was the usuall custome inthose times. Perdicano, the Father and Mother of Lisana, and she herselfe likewise, extraordinarily joyfull for this so fortunate amarriage, returned humble and hearty thankes both to the King andQueene, and (as many credible Authors doe affirme) the King kept hispromise made to Lisana, because (so long as he lived) he alwalestermed himselfe by the name of her Knight, and in al actions ofChivalry by him undertaken, he never carried any other devise, butsuch as he received still from her.
6.  Now trust me Salabetto, whatsoever redoundeth to thy good andbenefite, is the cheefest comfort of my soule, in regard I prize thylove dearer then mine owne life, and am most joyfull of thy returnehither againe; but much more of thy still abiding heere, because Iintend to live onely with thee, so soone as I have taken order forsome businesse of import. In the meane while, let me entreate theeto hold me excused, because before thy departure hence, thou camestsometimes to see me, without thy entrance admitted; and other-whilesagaine, found not such entertainement, as formerly had bene affoorded.But indeede, and above all the rest, in not re-paying thy moneyaccording to my promise. But consider good Salabetto, in what greattrouble and affliction of minde I then was, both in regard of myBrothers danger, and other important occurrences beside, whichmollestations do much distract the senses, and hinder kindecourtesies, which otherwise would bee extended liberally.

推荐功能

1.  Sufficient had he seene, and durst presume no further; but takingone of her Rings, which lay upon the Table, a purse of hers, hangingby on the wall, a light wearing Robe of silke, and her girdle, allwhich he put into the Chest; and being in himselfe, closed it fastas it was before, so continuing there in the Chamber two severallnights, the Gentlewoman neither mistrusting or missing any thing.The third day being come, the poore woman, according as formerly wasconcluded, came to have home her Chest againe, and brought it safelyinto her owne house; where Ambroginolo comming forth of it,satisfied the poore woman to her owne liking, returning (with allthe forenamed things) so fast as conveniently he could to Paris.
2.  A Monke having committed an offence, deserving to be very greevouslypunished, freed himselfe from the paine to be inflicted on him, bywittily reprehending his Abbot, with the very same fault.
3.  Now Madame, let me further give you to understand, that I am areligious person, and a pilgrime, and therefore am well acquaintedwith all the courses of their dealing; if therefore I speakesomewhat more amply of them, and for your good, it can not be sounseeming for mee to doe it, as it would appeare ugly in another. Inwhich respect, I will speake the more freely to you, to the ende, thatyou may take better knowledge of them, then (as it seemeth) hithertoyou have done. In former passed times such as professed Religion, werelearned and most holy persons; but our religious professours nowadayes, and such as covet to bee so esteemed; have no matter at all ofReligion in them, but onely the outward shew and habite. Which yetis no true badge of Religion neither, because it was ordained byreligious institutions, that their garments should bee made ofarrow, plaine, and coursest spun cloth, to make a publikemanifestation to the world, that (in meere devotion, and religiousdisposition) by wrapping their bodies in such base clothing, theycondemned and despised all temporall occasions. But now adaies theymake them large, deepe, glistering, and of the finest cloth or stuffesto bee gotten, reducing those habites to so proude and pontificall aforme, that they walke Peacock-like, rustling, and strouting with themin the Churches; yea, and in open publike places, as if they wereordinary secular persons, to have their pride more notoriouslyobserved. And as the Angler bestoweth his best cunning, with oneline and baite to catch many fishes at one strike; even so do thesecounterfeited habit-mongers, by their dissembling and craftydealing, beguile many credulous widdowes: simple women, yea, and menof weake capacity, to credit whatsoever they doe or say, and hereinthey doe most of all exercise themselves.
4.  THE THIRD DAY THE SIXTH NOVELL
5.   There dwelt sometime in Florence, and in the street of SaintBrancazio, a woollen Weaver, named John of Lorrayne; a man morehappy in his Art, then wise in any thing else beside: because,savouring somewhat of the Gregorie, and (in very deede)
6.  Bartolomea smiled to her self and without suffering him to proceedany further in speech, returned him this answere. I would have youto understand Sir, that my memory is not so oblivious, but I knowyou to be Signior Ricciardo di Cinzica, and my husband by name ortitle, but during the time that I was with you, it very ill appearedthat you had any knowledge of me. For if you had bene so wise andconsiderate, as (in your own judgement) the world reputed you to be,you could not be voide of so much apprehension, but did apparantlyperceive, that I was yong, fresh, and cheerefully disposed; and so (byconsequent) meet to know matters requisite for such young women,beside allowance of food and garments, though bashfulnesse and modestyforbid to utter it. But if studying the Lawes were more welcome to youthen a wife, you ought not to have maried, and you loose the worthyreputation of a judge, when you fall from that venerable profession,and make your selfe a common proclaimer of feasts and fasting dayes,lenten seasons, vigils, and solemnities due to Saints, which prohibitethe houshold conversation of husbands and wives.

应用

1.  Buffalmaco, Bruno, and the whole company, perceiving how hecontinued still his coughing and spetting, saide all with one voyce,That Calandrino was the Theefe to him selfe: and gave him manie grossespeeches beside, all departing home unto their houses, very muchdispleased and angry with him. After they were gone, none remainedwith him but the Priest, Bruno and Buffalmaco, who thus spake toCalandrino. I did ever thinke, that thou wast the theefe thy selfe,yet thou imputedst thy robbery to some other, for feare we should oncedrinke freely of thy purse, as thou hast done many times of ours.Calandrino, who had not yet ended his coughing and spetting, swaremany bitter Oathes, that his Brawne was stolne from him. Talke so longas thou wilt, quoth Buffalmaco, thy knavery is both knowne andseene, and well thou mayst be ashamed of thy selfe. Calandrino hearingthis, grew desperately angry; and to incense him more, Bruno thuspursued the matter.
2.  Ceremonious shew was made, of sending a servant to the Inne, for notexpecting Andreas presence at Supper, though no such matter wasperformed; but, after divers other discoursings, the table beingcovered, and variety of costly viands placed thereon, downe theysate to feeding, with plenty of curious Wines liberally walking about,so that it was darke night before they arose from the table. Andreathen offring to take his leave, she would (by no meanes) suffer it,but tolde him, that Naples was a Citie of such strict Lawes andOrdinances, as admitted no night-walkers, although they wereNatives, much lesse strangers, but punnished them with great severity.And therefore, as she had formerly sent word to his Inne, that theyshould not expect his comming to supper, the like had she doneconcerning his bed, intending to give her Brother Andrea one nightslodging, which as easily she could affoord him, as shee had done aSupper. All which this new-caught Woodcocke verily crediting, and thathe was in company of his owne Sister Fiordeliza (for so did shecunningly stile her selfe, and in which beleefe he was meerelydeluded) he accepted the more gladly her gentle offer, and concludedto stay there all that night.
3.  He verily beleeving all this false report, being troubled in hisminde thereat beyond measure, tooke the Gentlewoman by the hand,saying: Daughter, if thou be offended at these impudent follies,assuredly I cannot blame thee, nor will any wiseman reproove theefor it; and I commend thee for following my counsell. But let me alonefor schooling of my Gentleman, ill hath he kept his promise made tome; wherefore, in regard of his former offence, as also this otherso lately committed, I hope to set him in such heate, as shall makehim leave off from further injurying thee. Suffer not thy selfe tobe conquerd by choller, in disclosing this to thy kindred orhusband, because too much harme may ensue thereon. But feare not anywrong to thy selfe; for I am a true witnesse of thine honesty andvertue.
4、  But beware, saide Bruno, that thou do not gripe her over-hard, andin kissing, bee carefull of biting, because the teeth stand in thyhead like the pegges of a Lute, yet make a comely shew in thy fairewide mouth, thy cheekes looking like two of our artificiall Roses,swelling amiably, when thy jawes are well fild with meat. Calandrinohearing these hansome comnendations, thought himselfe a man ofaction already, going, singing, and frisking before his companie solively, as if he had not bin in his skin.
5、  THE FOURTH DAY, THE SIXTH NOVELL

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  • 普林斯维尔 08-05

      COURTESIE, OF A TRUE AND CONSTANT LOVER: AS ALSO THE

  • 吉比特 08-05

      About Evening, and (in this manner) alone by himselfe, neere tothe Palace of Nathan, he met him solitarily walking, not in pompousapparrell, whereby to bee distinguished from a meaner man: and,because he knew him not, neyther had heard any relation of hisdescription, he demanded of him, if he knew where Nathan then was?Nathan, with a chearfull countenance, thus replyed. Faire Syr, thereis no man in these parts, that knoweth better how to shew you Nathanthen I do; and therefore, if you be so pleased, I will bring you tohim. Mithridanes said, therein he should do him a great kindnesse:albeit (if it were possible) he would bee neyther knowne nor seeneof Nathan. And that (quoth he) can I also do sufficiently for you,seeing it is your will to have it so, if you will goe along with me.

  • 徐振东 08-05

       The night being over-past with infinite feares and afrights, andbright day saluting the world againe, with the expence of ninehoures and more, she fell to her former fruitlesse travailes. Beingsomewhat sharply bitten with hunger, because the former day andnight shee had not tasted any foode: shee made therefore a benefitof necessity, and fed on the greene hearbes so well as she could,not without any piercing afflictions, what should become of her inthis extraordinary misery. As shee walked in these pensivemeditations, she saw a Goate enter into a Cave, and (within a whileafter) come forth againe, wandring along thorow the woods. Whereuponshe stayed, and entred where she saw the beast issue foorth, where shefound two young Kids, yeaned (as it seemed) the selfesame day, whichsight was very pleasing to her, and nothing in that distresse couldmore content her.

  • 塞申斯 08-05

      No sooner did bright day appeare, but Theobaldo arose, havingacquainted her with such matters as were to be done, and once moreearnestly desiring her, to conceale (as yet) these occurrences toher selfe. So in his Pilgrims habit, he departed from her house, toawaite convenient: opportunity, for attending on the businessebelonging to Aldobrandino. At the usuall houre appointed, the Lordswere all set in the Signioria, and had received full information,concerning the offence imputed to Aldobrandino, setting him at libertyby publique consent, and sentencing the other malefactors withdeath, who (within a few dayes after) were beheaded in place themurther was committed. Thus Aldobrandino being released, to hisexceeding comfort, and no small joy of his daughter, kindred, andfriends, all knowing perfectly, that this had happened by the Pilgrimsmeanes, they conducted him home to Aldobrandinoes house, where theydesired him to continue so long as himselfe pleased, using him withmost honourable and gracious respect, bilt especially Hermelina, whoknew (better then the rest) on whom she bestowed her liberall favours,yet concealing all closely to her selfe. After two or three dayes wereover-past, in these complementall entercoursings of kindnesse,Theobaldo began to consider, that it was high time for reconciliation,to be solemnely past betweene his brethren and Aldobrandino. For, theywere not a little amazed at his strange deliverance, and went likewisecontinually armed, as standing in feare of Aldobrandino and hisfriends; which made him the more earnest, for accomplishment of thepromise formerly made unto him. Aldobrandino lovingly replied, that hewas ready to make good his word. Whereupon, the Pilgrime provided agoodly Banquet, whereat he pursued to have present Aldobrandino, hisDaughter, Kindred, and their wives. But first, himselfe went inperson, to invite them in peace to his banquet, using many pregnantand forcible reasons to them, such as are requisite in the likediscordant cases. In the end, they were so wise and prevailing withthem that they willingly condiscended, and thought it no disparagementunto them, for the recovery of Aldobrandinoes kindnesse againe, tocrave pardon for their great error committed. On the morrow following,about dinner time, the foure brethren of Theobaldo, attired in theirmourning garments, with their wives and frends came first to the houseof Aldobrandino, who purposely stayed for them; and having laiddowne their weapons on the ground, in the presence of all such asAldobrandino had invited as his witnesses, they offered themselvesto his mercy, and humbly required pardon of him, for the matterwherein they had offended him. Aldobrandino shedding teares, mostlovingly embraced them, and (to be briefe) pardoned whatsoeverinjuries he had received. After this, the sisters and wives, allclad in mourning, courteously submitted themselves, and weregraciously welcommed by Madame Hermelina, as also divers otherGentlewomen there present with her. Being all seated at the Tables,which were furnished with such rarities as could be wished for; althings else deserved their due commendation, but onely sad silence,occasioned by the fresh remembrance of sorow, appearing in the habitesof Theobaldoes friends and kindred, which the Pilgrim himselfe plainlyperceived, to be the onely disgrace to him and his feast. Wherefore,as before he had resolved, when time served to purge away thismelancholly, he arose from the Table, when some (as yet) had scarsebegun to eate, and thus spake.

  • 伍策 08-04

    {  When Bernardo heard these words, they were as so many stabs to hisheart, yea, beyond all compasse of patient sufferance, and by thechanging of his colour, it was noted manifestly, (being unable toutter one word) that Ambroginolo had spoken nothing but the truth.Within a while after, he saide; Gentlemen, that which Ambroginolo hathsaide, is very true, wherefore let him come when he will, and he shallbe paide; which accordingly he performed on the very next day, even tothe utmost penny, departing then from Paris towards Geneway, with amost malitious intention to his Wife: Being come neere to the City, hewould not enter it, but rode to a Country house of his, standing abouttenne miles distant thence. Being there arrived, he called aservant, in whom hee reposed especiall trust, sending him to Genewaywith two Horses, writing to his Wife, that he was returned, and sheeshould come thither to see him. But secretly he charged his servant,that so soone as he had brought her to a convenient place, he shouldthere kill her, without any pitty or compassion, and then returne tohim againe.

  • 秦茵 08-03

      Now was not any body neere, with coole water or any other remedyto helpe the recovery of her lost powers; wherefore her spiritsmight the more freely wander at their owne pleasure: but after theywere returned backe againe, and had won their wonted offices in herbody, drowned in teares, and wringing her hands, she did nothing butcall for her children and husband, straying all about in hope to findethem, seeking in caves, dens, and every where else, that presented theverie least glimpse of comfort. But when she saw all her paines sortto no purpose, and darke night drawing swiftly on, hope and dismayraising infinite perturbations, made her yet to be somewhat respectiveof her selfe, and therefore departing from the sea-shore, she returnedto the solitary place, where she used to sigh and mourne alone byher selfe.}

  • 李光兵 08-03

      As the enjoying of any thing in too much plenty, makes it appeareirkesome and loathing to us, and the deniall of our desires, do moreand more whet on the appetite: even so did the angry spleen of Ninettaproceed on in violence, against this new commenced love of Restagnone.For, in succession of time, whether he enjoyed the embracements of hisnew Mistresse, or no: yet Ninetta (by sinister reports, but muchmore through her owne jealous imaginations) held it for infallible,and to bee most certaine. Heereupon, she fell into an extreamemelancholly, which melancholly begat implacable fury, and(consequently) such contemptible disdaine, as converted her formerlykindely love to Restagnone, into Most cruell and bloudie hatred;yea, and so strangely was reason or respect confounded in her, as norevenge else but speed death, might satisfie the wrongs sheeimagined to receive by Restagnone and his Minion.

  • 袁珊签 08-03

      When they were come to the doore, Monna Tessa said to John: Thoumust cough and spet, at such time as I shall bid thee. Well (quothJohn) I will not faile you. Immediately she beganne her prayer in thismanner.

  • 许苏苏 08-02

       REGARD OF UNAVOYDABLE PERILLES ENSUING THEREBY

  • 任家顺 07-31

    {  Pasimondo had a Brother, yonger then he in yeeres, but not a jotinferiour to him in vertue, whose name was Hormisda, and long time thecase had bene in question, for his taking to wife a faire youngGentlewoman of Rhodes, called Cassandra; whom Lysimachus the Governourloved very dearly, and hindred her marriage with Hormisda, by diversstrange accidents. Now Pasimondo perceiving, that his owne Nuptialsrequired much cost and solemnity, hee thought it very convenient, thatone day might serve for both their Weddings, which else would lanchinto more lavish expences, and therefore concluded, that his brotherHormisda should marry Cassandra, at the same time as he weddedIphigenia. Hereupon, he consulted with the Gentlewomans parents, wholiking the motion as well as he, the determination was set downe,and one day to effect the duties of both.

  • 古玩城 07-31

      Now concerning the marriage feast and triumphes, they were performedwith no lesse pompe, then if she had beene daughter to the King ofFrance. And the young Bride apparantly declared, that (with hergarments) her minde and behavior were quite changed. For indeed sheewas (as it were shame to speake otherwise) a rare creature, both ofperson and perfections, and not onely was shee absolute for beautie,but so sweetely amiand gracious, and goodlie; as if she were not thedaughter of poore Janicula, and a Countrie Shepheardesse, but ratherof some Noble Lord, whereat every one wondred that had knowne her.Beside all this, shee was so obedient to her husband, so fervent inall dutifull offices, and patient, without the very least provoking:as hee held himselfe much more then contented, and the onely happy manof the world.

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