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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:娄勇志 大小:ULUo1rdO72186KB 下载:qcmBCfkL91851次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:h8u3fHRW63343条
日期:2020-08-04 22:17:05
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王俊

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "The men were broken-hearted as they heard me, and threwthemselves on the ground groaning and tearing their hair, but they didnot mend matters by crying. When we reached the sea shore, weeping andlamenting our fate, Circe brought the ram and the ewe, and we madethem fast hard by the ship. She passed through the midst of us withoutour knowing it, for who can see the comings and goings of a god, ifthe god does not wish to be seen?
2.  On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan. Earth-encirclingNeptune came, and Mercury the bringer of luck, and King Apollo, butthe goddesses stayed at home all of them for shame. Then the givers ofall good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared withinextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been,whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying:
3.  On this Telemachus went by torch-light to the other side of theinner court, to the room in which he always slept. There he lay in hisbed till morning, while Ulysses was left in the cloister ponderingon the means whereby with Minerva's help he might be able to killthe suitors.
4.  She cried aloud as she spoke, and the goddess heard her prayer;meanwhile the suitors were clamorous throughout the coveredcloister, and one of them said:
5.  "Son of Atreus," it said, "we used to say that Jove had loved youbetter from first to last than any other hero, for you were captainover many and brave men, when we were all fighting together beforeTroy; yet the hand of death, which no mortal can escape, was laid uponyou all too early. Better for you had you fallen at Troy in thehey-day of your renown, for the Achaeans would have built a mound overyour ashes, and your son would have been heir to your good name,whereas it has now been your lot to come to a most miserable end."
6.  "The ship ran before a fresh North wind till we had reached thesea that lies between Crete and Libya; there, however, Jove counselledtheir destruction, for as soon as we were well out from Crete andcould see nothing but sea and sky, he raised a black cloud over ourship and the sea grew dark beneath it. Then Jove let fly with histhunderbolts and the ship went round and round and was filled withfire and brimstone as the lightning struck it. The men fell all intothe sea; they were carried about in the water round the ship lookinglike so many sea-gulls, but the god presently deprived them of allchance of getting home again. I was all dismayed; Jove, however,sent the ship's mast within my reach, which saved my life, for I clungto it, and drifted before the fury of the gale. Nine days did Idrift but in the darkness of the tenth night a great wave bore me onto the Thesprotian coast. There Pheidon king of the Thesprotiansentertained me hospitably without charging me anything at all forhis son found me when I was nearly dead with cold and fatigue, whereonhe raised me by the hand, took me to his father's house and gave meclothes to wear.

计划指导

1.  Alcinous then led the way, and the others followed after, while aservant went to fetch Demodocus. The fifty-two picked oarsmen wentto the sea shore as they had been told, and when they got there theydrew the ship into the water, got her mast and sails inside her, boundthe oars to the thole-pins with twisted thongs of leather, all indue course, and spread the white sails aloft. They moored the vessel alittle way out from land, and then came on shore and went to the houseof King Alcinous. The outhouses, yards, and all the precincts werefilled with crowds of men in great multitudes both old and young;and Alcinous killed them a dozen sheep, eight full grown pigs, and twooxen. These they skinned and dressed so as to provide a magnificentbanquet.
2.  Ulysses smiled at this, and said to Telemachus, "Let your mother putme to any proof she likes; she will make up her mind about itpresently. She rejects me for the moment and believes me to besomebody else, because I am covered with dirt and have such badclothes on; let us, however, consider what we had better do next. Whenone man has killed another, even though he was not one who would leavemany friends to take up his quarrel, the man who has killed him muststill say good bye to his friends and fly the country; whereas we havebeen killing the stay of a whole town, and all the picked youth ofIthaca. I would have you consider this matter."
3.  "'Do not,' they exclaimed, 'be mad enough to provoke this savagecreature further; he has thrown one rock at us already which droveus back again to the mainland, and we made sure it had been thedeath of us; if he had then heard any further sound of voices he wouldhave pounded our heads and our ship's timbers into a jelly with therugged rocks he would have heaved at us, for he can throw them along way.'
4.  "My good friend," answered Jove, "I should recommend you at the verymoment when the people from the city are watching the ship on her way,to turn it into a rock near the land and looking like a ship. Thiswill astonish everybody, and you can then bury their city under themountain."
5.  When Euryclea heard this she unfastened the door of the women's roomand came out, following Telemachus. She found Ulysses among thecorpses bespattered with blood and filth like a lion that has justbeen devouring an ox, and his breast and both his cheeks are allbloody, so that he is a fearful sight; even so was Ulyssesbesmirched from head to foot with gore. When she saw all the corpsesand such a quantity of blood, she was beginning to cry out for joy,for she saw that a great deed had been done; but Ulysses checkedher, "Old woman," said he, "rejoice in silence; restrain yourself, anddo not make any noise about it; it is an unholy thing to vaunt overdead men. Heaven's doom and their own evil deeds have brought thesemen to destruction, for they respected no man in the whole world,neither rich nor poor, who came near them, and they have come to a badend as a punishment for their wickedness and folly. Now, however, tellme which of the women in the house have misconducted themselves, andwho are innocent."
6.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."

推荐功能

1.  "Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of themagician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens,but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed herin the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
2.  As for Melanthius, they took him through the cloister into the innercourt. There they cut off his nose and his ears; they drew out hisvitals and gave them to the dogs raw, and then in their fury theycut off his hands and his feet.
3.  As he was thus speaking a bird flew on his right hand- an eagle witha great white goose in its talons which it had carried off from thefarm yard- and all the men and women were running after it andshouting. It came quite close up to them and flew away on theirright hands in front of the horses. When they saw it they were glad,and their hearts took comfort within them, whereon Pisistratus said,"Tell me, Menelaus, has heaven sent this omen for us or for you?"
4.  "When I saw him I tried to pacify him and said, 'Ajax, will younot forget and forgive even in death, but must the judgement aboutthat hateful armour still rankle with you? It cost us Argives dearenough to lose such a tower of strength as you were to us. Wemourned you as much as we mourned Achilles son of Peleus himself,nor can the blame be laid on anything but on the spite which Jove boreagainst the Danaans, for it was this that made him counsel yourdestruction- come hither, therefore, bring your proud spirit intosubjection, and hear what I can tell you.'
5.   "Thence we sailed sadly on, glad to have escaped death, though wehad lost our comrades, and came to the Aeaean island, where Circelives a great and cunning goddess who is own sister to the magicianAeetes- for they are both children of the sun by Perse, who isdaughter to Oceanus. We brought our ship into a safe harbour without aword, for some god guided us thither, and having landed we there fortwo days and two nights, worn out in body and mind. When the morningof the third day came I took my spear and my sword, and went away fromthe ship to reconnoitre, and see if I could discover signs of humanhandiwork, or hear the sound of voices. Climbing to the top of ahigh look-out I espied the smoke of Circe's house rising upwardsamid a dense forest of trees, and when I saw this I doubted whether,having seen the smoke, I would not go on at once and find out more,but in the end I deemed it best to go back to the ship, give the mentheir dinners, and send some of them instead of going myself.
6.  The suitors bit their lips and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; but Amphinomus the son of Nisus, who was son to Aretias, said,"Do not let us take offence; it is reasonable, so let us make noanswer. Neither let us do violence to the stranger nor to any ofUlysses' servants. Let the cupbearer go round with thedrink-offerings, that we may make them and go home to our rest. As forthe stranger, let us leave Telemachus to deal with him, for it is tohis house that he has come."

应用

1.  "So I drew back, and sheathed my sword, whereon when he had drank ofthe blood he began with his prophecy.
2.  "Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
3.  Then he sat down on the hearth among the ashes and they all heldtheir peace, till presently the old hero Echeneus, who was anexcellent speaker and an elder among the Phaeacians, plainly and inall honesty addressed them thus:
4、  Menelaus on hearing this was very much shocked. "So," heexclaimed, "these cowards would usurp a brave man's bed? A hindmight as well lay her new born young in the lair of a lion, and thengo off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell: the lion whenhe comes back to his lair will make short work with the pair ofthem- and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By father Jove, Minerva,and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he was when he wrestledwith Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him so heavily that all theAchaeans cheered him- if he is still such and were to come nearthese suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.As regards your questions, however, I will not prevaricate nor deceiveyou, but will tell you without concealment all that the old man of thesea told me.
5、  Medon caught these words of Telemachus, for he was crouching under aseat beneath which he had hidden by covering himself up with a freshlyflayed heifer's hide, so he threw off the hide, went up to Telemachus,and laid hold of his knees.

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  • 雷克勒 08-03

      While he was thus in two minds Helen came down from her high vaultedand perfumed room, looking as lovely as Diana herself. Adraste broughther a seat, Alcippe a soft woollen rug while Phylo fetched her thesilver work-box which Alcandra wife of Polybus had given her.Polybus lived in Egyptian Thebes, which is the richest city in thewhole world; he gave Menelaus two baths, both of pure silver, twotripods, and ten talents of gold; besides all this, his wife gaveHelen some beautiful presents, to wit, a golden distaff, and asilver work-box that ran on wheels, with a gold band round the topof it. Phylo now placed this by her side, full of fine spun yarn,and a distaff charged with violet coloured wool was laid upon thetop of it. Then Helen took her seat, put her feet upon thefootstool, and began to question her husband.

  • 谢云双 08-03

      "'Stay where you are, then, 'answered I, 'eating and drinking at theship, but I must go, for I am most urgently bound to do so.'

  • 毕夏 08-03

       "Thus did she speak and we assented. We stayed with Circe for awhole twelvemonth feasting upon an untold quantity both of meat andwine. But when the year had passed in the waning of moons and the longdays had come round, my men called me apart and said, 'Sir, it is timeyou began to think about going home, if so be you are to be sparedto see your house and native country at all.'

  • 李寿诚 08-03

      She then went upstairs to her own room, not alone, but attended byher maidens, and when there, she lamented her dear husband tillMinerva shed sweet sleep over her eyelids.

  • 张红 08-02

    {  "You are quite right, Laodamas," replied Euryalus, "go up to yourguest and speak to him about it yourself."

  • 王艳红 08-01

      "As for me I live out of the way here with the pigs, and never go tothe town unless when Penelope sends for me on the arrival of some newsabout Ulysses. Then they all sit round and ask questions, both thosewho grieve over the king's absence, and those who rejoice at itbecause they can eat up his property without paying for it. For my ownpart I have never cared about asking anyone else since the time when Iwas taken in by an Aetolian, who had killed a man and come a longway till at last he reached my station, and I was very kind to him. Hesaid he had seen Ulysses with Idomeneus among the Cretans, refittinghis ships which had been damaged in a gale. He said Ulysses wouldreturn in the following summer or autumn with his men, and that hewould bring back much wealth. And now you, you unfortunate old man,since fate has brought you to my door, do not try to flatter me inthis way with vain hopes. It is not for any such reason that I shalltreat you kindly, but only out of respect for Jove the god ofhospitality, as fearing him and pitying you."}

  • 库·乌马罗夫 08-01

      Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"

  • 宋颂 08-01

      The old woman swore most solemnly that she would not, and when shehad completed her oath, she began drawing off the wine into jars,and getting the barley meal into the bags, while Telemachus wentback to the suitors.

  • 石涧 07-31

       Ulysses looked sternly at him and answered, "If you were theirsacrificing priest, you must have prayed many a time that it mightbe long before I got home again, and that you might marry my wifeand have children by her. Therefore you shall die."

  • 胡博·华士 07-29

    {  To this Penelope said, "As long, sir, as you will sit here andtalk to me, I can have no desire to go to bed. Still, people cannot dopermanently without sleep, and heaven has appointed us dwellers onearth a time for all things. I will therefore go upstairs andrecline upon that couch which I have never ceased to flood with mytears from the day Ulysses set out for the city with a hateful name."

  • 丹尼斯罗德曼 07-29

      Menelaus then greeted them saying, "Fall to, and welcome; when youhave done supper I shall ask who you are, for the lineage of suchmen as you cannot have been lost. You must be descended from a line ofsceptre-bearing kings, for poor people do not have such sons as youare."

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