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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:何深意 大小:Q1v46GwY75361KB 下载:6LfJi2JM74700次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:pVgv8vnE39909条
日期:2020-08-05 17:13:01
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "And now for yourself- stay here some ten or twelve days longer, andI will then speed you on your way. I will make you a noble presentof a chariot and three horses. I will also give you a beautifulchalice that so long as you live you may think of me whenever you makea drink-offering to the immortal gods."
2.  Then the other maids in the house rose and lit the fire on thehearth; Telemachus also rose and put on his clothes. He girded hissword about his shoulder, bound his sandals on his comely feet, andtook a doughty spear with a point of sharpened bronze; then he went tothe threshold of the cloister and said to Euryclea, "Nurse, did youmake the stranger comfortable both as regards bed and board, or didyou let him shift for himself?- for my mother, good woman though sheis, has a way of paying great attention to second-rate people, andof neglecting others who are in reality much better men."
3.  Thus did he pray, and Minerva heard his prayer. He then led theway to his own house, followed by his sons and sons-in-law. Whenthey had got there and had taken their places on the benches andseats, he mixed them a bowl of sweet wine that was eleven years oldwhen the housekeeper took the lid off the jar that held it. As hemixed the wine, he prayed much and made drink-offerings to Minerva,daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove. Then, when they had made theirdrink-offerings and had drunk each as much as he was minded, theothers went home to bed each in his own abode; but Nestor putTelemachus to sleep in the room that was over the gateway along withPisistratus, who was the only unmarried son now left him. As forhimself, he slept in an inner room of the house, with the queen hiswife by his side.
4.  "May Jove so grant it," replied Telemachus; "if it should prove tobe so, I will make vows to you as though you were a god, even when Iam at home."
5.  "Eumaeus, and all of you, to-morrow I want to go away and beginbegging about the town, so as to be no more trouble to you or toyour men. Give me your advice therefore, and let me have a goodguide to go with me and show me the way. I will go the round of thecity begging as I needs must, to see if any one will give me a drinkand a piece of bread. I should like also to go to the house of Ulyssesand bring news of her husband to queen Penelope. I could then go aboutamong the suitors and see if out of all their abundance they will giveme a dinner. I should soon make them an excellent servant in all sortsof ways. Listen and believe when I tell you that by the blessing ofMercury who gives grace and good name to the works of all men, thereis no one living who would make a more handy servant than I should- toput fresh wood on the fire, chop fuel, carve, cook, pour out wine, anddo all those services that poor men have to do for their betters."
6.  "'My friends,' said I, 'we have meat and drink in the ship, let usmind, therefore, and not touch the cattle, or we shall suffer forit; for these cattle and sheep belong to the mighty sun, who seesand gives ear to everything. And again they promised that they wouldobey.

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1.  "He then took the cup and drank. He was so delighted with thetaste of the wine that he begged me for another bowl full. 'Be sokind,' he said, 'as to give me some more, and tell me your name atonce. I want to make you a present that you will be glad to have. Wehave wine even in this country, for our soil grows grapes and thesun ripens them, but this drinks like nectar and ambrosia all in one.'
2.  When he had thus spoken, he went back to the house and took the seatthat he had left. Presently, his two servants followed him inside.
3.  "When we reached it we went ashore to take in water, and dinedhard by the ships. Immediately after dinner I took a herald and one ofmy men and went straight to the house of Aeolus, where I found himfeasting with his wife and family; so we sat down as suppliants on thethreshold. They were astounded when they saw us and said, 'Ulysses,what brings you here? What god has been ill-treating you? We tookgreat pains to further you on your way home to Ithaca, or whereverit was that you wanted to go to.'
4.  "I stayed there for seven years and got together much money amongthe Egyptians, for they all gave me something; but when it was nowgoing on for eight years there came a certain Phoenician, a cunningrascal, who had already committed all sorts of villainy, and thisman talked me over into going with him to Phoenicia, where his houseand his possessions lay. I stayed there for a whole twelve months, butat the end of that time when months and days had gone by till the sameseason had come round again, he set me on board a ship bound forLibya, on a pretence that I was to take a cargo along with him to thatplace, but really that he might sell me as a slave and take themoney I fetched. I suspected his intention, but went on board withhim, for I could not help it.
5.  "See to the lid yourself, and have the whole bound round at once,for fear any one should rob you by the way when you are asleep in yourship."
6.  With these words he picked up the sword that Agelaus had droppedwhen he was being killed, and which was lying upon the ground. Then hestruck Leiodes on the back of his neck, so that his head fellrolling in the dust while he was yet speaking.

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1.  "Telemachus," said she, "the men are on board and at their oars,waiting for you to give your orders, so make haste and let us be off."
2.  "And I answered, 'Circe, how can you expect me to be friendly withyou when you have just been turning all my men into pigs? And now thatyou have got me here myself, you mean me mischief when you ask me togo to bed with you, and will unman me and make me fit for nothing. Ishall certainly not consent to go to bed with you unless you willfirst take your solemn oath to plot no further harm against me.'
3.  As he spoke he went inside the buildings to the cloister where thesuitors were, but Argos died as soon as he had recognized his master.
4.  "But I rushed at her with my sword drawn as though I would kill her,whereon she fell with a loud scream, clasped my knees, and spokepiteously, saying, 'Who and whence are you? from what place and peoplehave you come? How can it be that my drugs have no power to charm you?Never yet was any man able to stand so much as a taste of the herb Igave you; you must be spell-proof; surely you can be none other thanthe bold hero Ulysses, who Mercury always said would come here someday with his ship while on his way home form Troy; so be it then;sheathe your sword and let us go to bed, that we may make friendsand learn to trust each other.'
5.   Then Telemachus went all alone by the sea side, washed his handsin the grey waves, and prayed to Minerva.
6.  "Father Jove," he cried, "and all you other blessed gods who livefor ever, come here and see the ridiculous and disgraceful sightthat I will show you. Jove's daughter Venus is always dishonouringme because I am lame. She is in love with Mars, who is handsome andclean built, whereas I am a cripple- but my parents are to blame forthat, not I; they ought never to have begotten me. Come and see thepair together asleep on my bed. It makes me furious to look at them.They are very fond of one another, but I do not think they will liethere longer than they can help, nor do I think that they will sleepmuch; there, however, they shall stay till her father has repaid methe sum I gave him for his baggage of a daughter, who is fair butnot honest."

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1.  "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."
2.  "But the men disobeyed my orders, took to their own devices, andravaged the land of the Egyptians, killing the men, and taking theirwives and children captives. The alarm was soon carried to the city,and when they heard the war-cry, the people came out at daybreaktill the plain was filled with soldiers horse and foot, and with thegleam of armour. Then Jove spread panic among my men, and they wouldno longer face the enemy, for they found themselves surrounded. TheEgyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forcedlabour for them; as for myself, they gave me to a friend who met them,to take to Cyprus, Dmetor by name, son of Iasus, who was a great manin Cyprus. Thence I am come hither in a state of great misery."
3.  "So they did as I told them; but I said nothing about the awfulmonster Scylla, for I knew the men would not on rowing if I did, butwould huddle together in the hold. In one thing only did I disobeyCirce's strict instructions- I put on my armour. Then seizing twostrong spears I took my stand on the ship Is bows, for it was therethat I expected first to see the monster of the rock, who was to do mymen so much harm; but I could not make her out anywhere, though Istrained my eyes with looking the gloomy rock all over and over
4、  "Firstly, then, I will tell you my name that you too may know it,and one day, if I outlive this time of sorrow, may become my thereguests though I live so far away from all of you. I am Ulysses sonof Laertes, reknowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, sothat my fame ascends to heaven. I live in Ithaca, where there is ahigh mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far fromit there is a group of islands very near to one another- Dulichium,Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus. It lies squat on thehorizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while theothers lie away from it towards dawn. It is a rugged island, but itbreeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love tolook upon. The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, andwanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddessCirce; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there isnothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, andhowever splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be farfrom father or mother, he does not care about it. Now, however, I willtell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove's will I metwith on my return from Troy.
5、  "But how, Mentor," replied Telemachus, "dare I go up to Nestor,and how am I to address him? I have never yet been used to holdinglong conversations with people, and am ashamed to begin questioningone who is so much older than myself."

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  • 冉国元 08-04

      Telemachus answered, "The fault, father, is mine, and mine only; Ileft the store room door open, and they have kept a sharper look outthan I have. Go, Eumaeus, put the door to, and see whether it is oneof the women who is doing this, or whether, as I suspect, it isMelanthius the son of Dolius."

  • 吴莫愁 08-04

      Telemachus and the son of Nestor stayed their horses at the gate,whereon Eteoneus servant to Menelaus came out, and as soon as he sawthem ran hurrying back into the house to tell his Master. He wentclose up to him and said, "Menelaus, there are some strangers comehere, two men, who look like sons of Jove. What are we to do? Shall wetake their horses out, or tell them to find friends elsewhere asthey best can?"

  • 徐乐 08-04

       As he spoke he kissed his son, and a tear fell from his cheek onto the ground, for he had restrained all tears till now. butTelemachus could not yet believe that it was his father, and said:

  • 海登 08-04

      So Eumaeus went up to him and said, "Stranger, Telemachus sendsyou this, and says you are to go the round of the suitors begging, forbeggars must not be shamefaced."

  • 柳德米拉 08-03

    {  "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.

  • 宋方灿 08-02

      Ulysses answered, "Take heart and do not trouble yourself aboutthat, but let us go into the house hard by your garden. I have alreadytold Telemachus, Philoetius, and Eumaeus to go on there and get dinnerready as soon as possible."}

  • 库勒拜乡巴勒 08-02

      "Thus did she speak and we assented. We stayed with Circe for awhole twelvemonth feasting upon an untold quantity both of meat andwine. But when the year had passed in the waning of moons and the longdays had come round, my men called me apart and said, 'Sir, it is timeyou began to think about going home, if so be you are to be sparedto see your house and native country at all.'

  • 王友鑫 08-02

      With these words she flew away like a bird into the air, but she hadgiven Telemachus courage, and had made him think more than everabout his father. He felt the change, wondered at it, and knew thatthe stranger had been a god, so he went straight to where thesuitors were sitting.

  • 孙丽芳 08-01

       To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."

  • 陈炸雄 07-30

    {  Telemachus answered, "The fault, father, is mine, and mine only; Ileft the store room door open, and they have kept a sharper look outthan I have. Go, Eumaeus, put the door to, and see whether it is oneof the women who is doing this, or whether, as I suspect, it isMelanthius the son of Dolius."

  • 艾里森·博塔 07-30

      "First observe this scar," answered Ulysses, "which I got from aboar's tusk when I was hunting on Mount Parnassus. You and my motherhad sent me to Autolycus, my mother's father, to receive thepresents which when he was over here he had promised to give me.Furthermore I will point out to you the trees in the vineyard whichyou gave me, and I asked you all about them as I followed you roundthe garden. We went over them all, and you told me their names andwhat they all were. You gave me thirteen pear trees, ten appletrees, and forty fig trees; you also said you would give me fifty rowsof vines; there was corn planted between each row, and they yieldgrapes of every kind when the heat of heaven has been laid heavyupon them."

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