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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:郭跃进 大小:dzbDRGG784967KB 下载:4kKs9PfM53768次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:hqvT8gQd94355条
日期:2020-08-05 08:34:40
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  This was what they said, but they did not know what was going tohappen. Then Antinous said, "Comrades, let there be no loud talking,lest some of it get carried inside. Let us be up and do that insilence, about which we are all of a mind."
2.  In the end he deemed it best to take to the woods, and he foundone upon some high ground not far from the water. There he creptbeneath two shoots of olive that grew from a single stock- the onean ungrafted sucker, while the other had been grafted. No wind,however squally, could break through the cover they afforded, norcould the sun's rays pierce them, nor the rain get through them, soclosely did they grow into one another. Ulysses crept under theseand began to make himself a bed to lie on, for there was a greatlitter of dead leaves lying about- enough to make a covering for twoor three men even in hard winter weather. He was glad enough to seethis, so he laid himself down and heaped the leaves all round him.Then, as one who lives alone in the country, far from any neighbor,hides a brand as fire-seed in the ashes to save himself from having toget a light elsewhere, even so did Ulysses cover himself up withleaves; and Minerva shed a sweet sleep upon his eyes, closed hiseyelids, and made him lose all memories of his sorrows.
3.  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.
4.  "Thus she both was, and still is, respected beyond measure by herchildren, by Alcinous himself, and by the whole people, who lookupon her as a goddess, and greet her whenever she goes about the city,for she is a thoroughly good woman both in head and heart, and whenany women are friends of hers, she will help their husbands also tosettle their disputes. If you can gain her good will, you may haveevery hope of seeing your friends again, and getting safely back toyour home and country."
5.  "Then he dived under the sea, and she in due course bore Peliasand Neleus, who both of them served Jove with all their might.Pelias was a great breeder of sheep and lived in Iolcus, but the otherlived in Pylos. The rest of her children were by Cretheus, namely,Aeson, Pheres, and Amythaon, who was a mighty warrior and charioteer.
6.  When he had thus spoken, he went back to the house and took the seatthat he had left. Presently, his two servants followed him inside.

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1.  On this he gave his orders to the servants, who got the waggonout, harnessed the mules, and put them to, while the girl broughtthe clothes down from the linen room and placed them on the waggon.Her mother prepared her a basket of provisions with all sorts ofgood things, and a goat skin full of wine; the girl now got into thewaggon, and her mother gave her also a golden cruse of oil, that sheand her women might anoint themselves. Then she took the whip andreins and lashed the mules on, whereon they set off, and their hoofsclattered on the road. They pulled without flagging, and carried notonly Nausicaa and her wash of clothes, but the maids also who werewith her.
2.  Thus did she speak, and they did even as she had said: twenty ofthem went to the fountain for water, and the others set themselvesbusily to work about the house. The men who were in attendance onthe suitors also came up and began chopping firewood. By and by thewomen returned from the fountain, and the swineherd came after themwith the three best pigs he could pick out. These he let feed aboutthe premises, and then he said good-humouredly to Ulysses,"Stranger, are the suitors treating you any better now, or are they asinsolent as ever?"
3.  "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."
4.  Thus did he pray, and Minerva heard his prayer, but she would notshow herself to him openly, for she was afraid of her uncle Neptune,who was still furious in his endeavors to prevent Ulysses from gettinghome.
5.  Penelope then spoke to him. "Antinous," said she, "it is not rightthat you should ill-treat any guest of Telemachus who comes to thishouse. If the stranger should prove strong enough to string the mightybow of Ulysses, can you suppose that he would take me home with himand make me his wife? Even the man himself can have no such idea inhis mind: none of you need let that disturb his feasting; it wouldbe out of all reason."
6.  While he was thus in two minds a wave caught him and took him withsuch force against the rocks that he would have been smashed andtorn to pieces if Minerva had not shown him what to do. He caught holdof the rock with both hands and clung to it groaning with pain tillthe wave retired, so he was saved that time; but presently the wavecame on again and carried him back with it far into the sea-tearinghis hands as the suckers of a polypus are torn when some one plucks itfrom its bed, and the stones come up along with it even so did therocks tear the skin from his strong hands, and then the wave drewhim deep down under the water.

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1.  With this Telemachus dashed his staff to the ground and burst intotears. Every one was very sorry for him, but they all sat still and noone ventured to make him an angry answer, save only Antinous, whospoke thus:
2.  "On this Hercules went down again into the house of Hades, but Istayed where I was in case some other of the mighty dead should cometo me. And I should have seen still other of them that are gonebefore, whom I would fain have seen- Theseus and Pirithous gloriouschildren of the gods, but so many thousands of ghosts came round meand uttered such appalling cries, that I was panic stricken lestProserpine should send up from the house of Hades the head of thatawful monster Gorgon. On this I hastened back to my ship and orderedmy men to go on board at once and loose the hawsers; so theyembarked and took their places, whereon the ship went down thestream of the river Oceanus. We had to row at first, but presently afair wind sprang up.
3.  "And I said, 'Agamemnon, why do you ask me? I do not know whetheryour son is alive or dead, and it is not right to talk when one doesnot know.'
4.  "Do not wake her yet," answered Ulysses, "but tell the women whohave misconducted themselves to come to me."
5.   "I will tell you everything," answered Ulysses, "quite truly. I comefrom Alybas, where I have a fine house. I am son of king Apheidas, whois the son of Polypemon. My own name is Eperitus; heaven drove meoff my course as I was leaving Sicania, and I have been carried hereagainst my will. As for my ship it is lying over yonder, off theopen country outside the town, and this is the fifth year sinceUlysses left my country. Poor fellow, yet the omens were good forhim when he left me. The birds all flew on our right hands, and bothhe and I rejoiced to see them as we parted, for we had every hope thatwe should have another friendly meeting and exchange presents."
6.  When earth-encircling Neptune heard this he went to Scheria wherethe Phaecians live, and stayed there till the ship, which was makingrapid way, had got close-in. Then he went up to it, turned it intostone, and drove it down with the flat of his hand so as to root it inthe ground. After this he went away.

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1.  "On this the men would have come with me at once, but Eurylochustried to hold them back and said, 'Alas, poor wretches that we are,what will become of us? Rush not on your ruin by going to the house ofCirce, who will turn us all into pigs or wolves or lions, and we shallhave to keep guard over her house. Remember how the Cyclops treated uswhen our comrades went inside his cave, and Ulysses with them. Itwas all through his sheer folly that those men lost their lives.'
2.  Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. When she deemed thatUlysses had had both of his wife and of repose, she badegold-enthroned Dawn rise out of Oceanus that she might shed light uponmankind. On this, Ulysses rose from his comfortable bed and said toPenelope, "Wife, we have both of us had our full share of troubles,you, here, in lamenting my absence, and I in being prevented fromgetting home though I was longing all the time to do so. Now, however,that we have at last come together, take care of the property thatis in the house. As for the sheep and goats which the wicked suitorshave eaten, I will take many myself by force from other people, andwill compel the Achaeans to make good the rest till they shall havefilled all my yards. I am now going to the wooded lands out in thecountry to see my father who has so long been grieved on my account,and to yourself I will give these instructions, though you have littleneed of them. At sunrise it will at once get abroad that I have beenkilling the suitors; go upstairs, therefore, and stay there withyour women. See nobody and ask no questions."
3.  Ulysses answered, "Take heart and do not trouble yourself aboutthat, but let us go into the house hard by your garden. I have alreadytold Telemachus, Philoetius, and Eumaeus to go on there and get dinnerready as soon as possible."
4、  "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."
5、  Eurymachus son of Polybus then said, "Go home, old man, and prophesyto your own children, or it may be worse for them. I can read theseomens myself much better than you can; birds are always flying aboutin the sunshine somewhere or other, but they seldom mean anything.Ulysses has died in a far country, and it is a pity you are not deadalong with him, instead of prating here about omens and adding fuel tothe anger of Telemachus which is fierce enough as it is. I suppose youthink he will give you something for your family, but I tell you-and it shall surely be- when an old man like you, who should knowbetter, talks a young one over till he becomes troublesome, in thefirst place his young friend will only fare so much the worse- he willtake nothing by it, for the suitors will prevent this- and in thenext, we will lay a heavier fine, sir, upon yourself than you willat all like paying, for it will bear hardly upon you. As forTelemachus, I warn him in the presence of you all to send his motherback to her father, who will find her a husband and provide her withall the marriage gifts so dear a daughter may expect. Till we shall goon harassing him with our suit; for we fear no man, and care neitherfor him, with all his fine speeches, nor for any fortune-telling ofyours. You may preach as much as you please, but we shall only hateyou the more. We shall go back and continue to eat up Telemachus'sestate without paying him, till such time as his mother leaves offtormenting us by keeping us day after day on the tiptoe ofexpectation, each vying with the other in his suit for a prize of suchrare perfection. Besides we cannot go after the other women whom weshould marry in due course, but for the way in which she treats us."

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  • 王亚伟 08-04

      "First observe this scar," answered Ulysses, "which I got from aboar's tusk when I was hunting on Mount Parnassus. You and my motherhad sent me to Autolycus, my mother's father, to receive thepresents which when he was over here he had promised to give me.Furthermore I will point out to you the trees in the vineyard whichyou gave me, and I asked you all about them as I followed you roundthe garden. We went over them all, and you told me their names andwhat they all were. You gave me thirteen pear trees, ten appletrees, and forty fig trees; you also said you would give me fifty rowsof vines; there was corn planted between each row, and they yieldgrapes of every kind when the heat of heaven has been laid heavyupon them."

  • 营销—让 08-04

      A servant presently led in the famous bard Demodocus, whom themuse had dearly loved, but to whom she had given both good and evil,for though she had endowed him with a divine gift of song, she hadrobbed him of his eyesight. Pontonous set a seat for him among theguests, leaning it up against a bearing-post. He hung the lyre for himon a peg over his head, and showed him where he was to feel for itwith his hands. He also set a fair table with a basket of victualsby his side, and a cup of wine from which he might drink whenever hewas so disposed.

  • 蔡依伯 08-04

       "The first ghost 'that came was that of my comrade Elpenor, for hehad not yet been laid beneath the earth. We had left his bodyunwaked and unburied in Circe's house, for we had had too much else todo. I was very sorry for him, and cried when I saw him: 'Elpenor,'said I, 'how did you come down here into this gloom and darkness?You have here on foot quicker than I have with my ship.'

  • 张红璐 08-04

      "They all swore as I bade them, and when they had completed theiroath we made the ship fast in a harbour that was near a stream offresh water, and the men went ashore and cooked their suppers. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, they began talking abouttheir poor comrades whom Scylla had snatched up and eaten; this setthem weeping and they went on crying till they fell off into a soundsleep.

  • 张韶涵 08-03

    {  "Then Jove let fly with his thunderbolts, and the ship went roundand round, and was filled with fire and brimstone as the lightningstruck it. The men all fell into the sea; they were carried about inthe water round the ship, looking like so many sea-gulls, but thegod presently deprived them of all chance of getting home again.

  • 龙游 08-02

      This was what he said, and more than half raised a loud shout, andat once left the assembly. But the rest stayed where they were, forthe speech of Halitherses displeased them, and they sided withEupeithes; they therefore hurried off for their armour, and whenthey had armed themselves, they met together in front of the city, andEupeithes led them on in their folly. He thought he was going toavenge the murder of his son, whereas in truth he was never to return,but was himself to perish in his attempt.}

  • 杨美乐 08-02

      As she spoke she shed sleep over his eyes, and then went back toOlympus.

  • 郭广昌 08-02

      BOOK XIII.

  • 赖剑秋 08-01

       THEN, when we had got down to the sea shore we drew our ship intothe water and got her mast and sails into her; we also put the sheepon board and took our places, weeping and in great distress of mind.Circe, that great and cunning goddess, sent us a fair wind that blewdead aft and stayed steadily with us keeping our sails all the timewell filled; so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear andlet her go as the wind and helmsman headed her. All day long her sailswere full as she held her course over the sea, but when the sun wentdown and darkness was over all the earth, we got into the deepwaters of the river Oceanus, where lie the land and city of theCimmerians who live enshrouded in mist and darkness which the raysof the sun never pierce neither at his rising nor as he goes downagain out of the heavens, but the poor wretches live in one longmelancholy night. When we got there we beached the ship, took thesheep out of her, and went along by the waters of Oceanus till we cameto the place of which Circe had told us.

  • 杜丹 07-30

    {  "Antinous, insolent and wicked schemer, they say you are the bestspeaker and counsellor of any man your own age in Ithaca, but youare nothing of the kind. Madman, why should you try to compass thedeath of Telemachus, and take no heed of suppliants, whose witnessis Jove himself? It is not right for you to plot thus against oneanother. Do you not remember how your father fled to this house infear of the people, who were enraged against him for having gonewith some Taphian pirates and plundered the Thesprotians who were atpeace with us? They wanted to tear him in pieces and eat up everythinghe had, but Ulysses stayed their hands although they wereinfuriated, and now you devour his property without paying for it, andbreak my heart by his wooing his wife and trying to kill his son.Leave off doing so, and stop the others also."

  • 吴思澜 07-30

      "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."

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