0 捕鱼达人2无限金币-APP安装下载

捕鱼达人2无限金币 注册最新版下载

捕鱼达人2无限金币 注册

捕鱼达人2无限金币注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:焦敏 大小:ATxzE5WA92312KB 下载:mcD6oogK30062次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:jdTJ8ZuZ16624条
日期:2020-08-06 19:56:05
安卓
钟建财

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  There was in the Country of Lunigiana (which is not far distant fromour owne) a Monastery, which sometime was better furnished withholinesse and Religion, then now adayes they are: wherein lived (amongdivers other) a yong Novice Monke, whose hot and lusty disposition(being in the vigour of his yeeres) was such, as neither Fasts norprayers had any great power over him. It chanced on a fasting dayabout high noon, when all the other Monkes were asleep in theirDormitaries or Dorters, this frolicke Friar was walking alone in theirChurch, which stoode in a very solitarie place, where ruminating onmany matters by himselfe, hee espyed a prettie handsome Wench (someHusbandmans daughter in the Countrey, that had beene gatheringrootes and hearbes in the field) upon her knees before in Altar;whom he had no sooner seene, but immediately hee felt effeminatetemptations, and such as ill fitted with his profession.
2.  Let passe the wanton follies passing betweene them, and come toMadame Catulla, who finding it a fit and convenient time, to ventforth the tempest of her spleene, began in this manner. Alas! howmighty, are the misfortunes of women, and how ill requited is allthe loyall love of many wives to their husbands? I, a pooremiserable Lady, who, for the space of eight yeeres now fullycompleated, have loved thee: more dearely then mine owne life, findenow (to my hearts endlesse griefe) how thou wastest and consumestthy desires, to delight them with a strange woman, like a most vileand wicked man as thou art. With whom doest thou now imagine thy selfeto be? Thou art with her, whom thou hast long time deluded by falseblandishments, feigning to affect her, when thou doatest in thydesires else-where. I am thine owne Catulla, and not the wife ofRicciardo, trayterous and unfaithfull man, as thou art. I am sure thouknowest my voyce, and I thinke it a thousand yeeres, until wee may seeeach other in the light, to doe thee such dishonour as thou justlydeservest, dogged, disdainfull, and villainous wretch. By conceivingto have another woman in thy wanton embraces thou hast declared morejoviall disposition, and demonstrations of farre greater kindnesse,then domesticke familiarity. At home thou lookest sower, sullen orsurly, often froward, and seldome well pleased. But the best is,whereas thou intendest this husbandrie for another mans ground, thouhast (against thy will) bestowed it on thine owne, and the waterhath runne a contrary course, quite from the current where thoumeantst it.
3.  Pedro, who was young, and likewise Violenta, went farre more lightlythen her Mother and her company, as much perhaps provoked by love,as feare of the sudden raine falling, and paced on so fast beforethem, that they were wholly out of sight. After many flashes oflightning, and a few dreadfull clappes of thunder, there fell such atempestuous showre of hayle, as compelled the Mother and her traine toshelter themselves in a poore Countrey-mans Cottage. Pedro andViolenta, having no other refuge, ranne likewise into a pooreSheepecoate, so over-ruined, as it was in danger to fall on theirheads; and no body dwelt in it, neither stood any other house neereit, and it was scarsely any shelter for them, howbeit, necessityenforceth to make shift with the meanest. The storme encreasing moreand more, and they coveting to avoyd it as well as they could;sighes and drie hemmes were often inter-vented, as dumbly (before)they were wont to doe, when willingly they could affoord another kindeof speaking.
4.  Piero, my Father and thine, dwelt long time (as thou canst notchoose but to have understood) in Palermo; where, through thebounty, and other gracious good parts remaining in him, he was muchrenowned, and to this day, is no doubt remembred, by many of hisloving Friends and Wellwillers. Among them that most intimatelyaffected Piero, my mother (who was Gentlewoman, and at that time awidow) did deerest of all other love him; so that: forgetting thefeare of her Father, Brethren, yea, and her owne honour, they becameso privately acquainted, that I was begotten, and am heere now such asthou seest me. Afterward, occasions so befalling our Father, toabandon Palermo, and returne to Perouse, he left my mother and mehis little daughter, never after (for ought that I could learne)once remembring either her or me: so that (if he had not beene myFather) I could have much condemned him, in regard of hisingratitude to my mother, and love which hee ought to have shewne meas his childe, being borne of no Chamber-maide, neyther of a Cittysinner; albeit I must needes say, that she was blame-worthy, withoutany further knowledge of him (rioved onely thereto by most loyalaffection) to commit both her selfe, and all the wealth shee had, intohis hands: but things ill done, and so long time since, are moreeasily controulled, then amended.Being left so young at Palermo, and growing (well neere) to thestature as now you see me; my Mother (being wealthy) gave me inmarriage to one of the Gergentes Family, a Gentleman, and of greatrevennues, who in his love to me and my mother, went and dwelt atPalermo: where falling into the Guelphes Faction, and making one inthe enterprize with Charles our King; it came to passe, that they werediscovered to Fredericke King of Arragon, before their intent could beput in execution: Whereupon, we were enforced to flye from Sicily,even when my hope stoode fairely, to have beene the greatest Lady inall the Island. Packing up then such few things as wee could take withus, (few I may well call them, in regard of our wealthy possessions,both in Pallaces, Houses, and Lands, all which we were constrainedto forgo:) we made our recourse to this Citty, where we found KingCharles so benigne and gracious to us, that recompencing the greaterpart of our losses, he bestowed Lands and houses on us here, besidea continuall large pension to my husband your brother in Law, asheereafter himselfe shall better acquaint you withal. Thus came Ihither, and thus remaine here, where I am able to welcome my brotherAndrea, thankes more to Fortune, then any friendlinesse in him. Withwhich words she embraced and kissed him many times, sighing andweeping as she did before.Andrea hearing this Fable so artificially delivered, composed frompoint to point with such likely protestations, without faltring orfailing in any one words utterance; and remembring perfectly fortruth, that his Father had formerly dwelt at Palermo; knowing also (bysome sensible feeling in himselfe) the custome of young people, whoare easily conquered by affection in their youthfull heate, seeingbeside the tears, trembling speeches, and earnest embracings of thiscunning commodity; he tooke all to be true by her thus spoken, andupon her silence, thus replyed. Lady, let it not seeme strange to you,that your words have raysed marvell in me, because (indeed) I had noknowledge of you, even no more then as if I had never seene you: neveralso having heard my father speak either of you or your mother (forsome considerations best known unto himselfe:) or if at any time heused such language, either my youth then, or defective memory since,hath utterly lost it. But truely, it is no little joy and comfort tome, to finde a sister here, where I had no such hope or expectation,and where also myselfe am a meere stranger. For to speake my mindefreely of you, and the perfections gracefully appearing in you Iknow not any man of how great repute or qualitie soever, but you maywell beseeme his acceptance, much rather then mine, that am but a meanMerchant. But faire Sister, I desire to be resolved in one thing, towit; by what means you had understanding of my being in this City?whereto readily she returned him this answer.
5.  And although they might then be knowne to very few, yet theinhabitants of the Country generally, understoode little or nothing atall of them. For there, the pure simplicitie of their ancientpredecessors still continuing; they had not seene any Parrots, or somuch as heard any speech of them. Wherefore the two crafty consorts,not a little joyfull of finding the Feather, tooke it thence withthem, and beecause they would not leave the Cabinet empty, espyingCharcoales lying in a corner of the Chamber, they filled it with them,wrapping it up againe in the Taffata, and in as demure manner asthey found it. So, away came they with the Feather, neither seene orsuspected by any one, intending now to heare what Friar Onyon wouldsay, uppon the losse of his precious Relique, and finding the Coalesthere placed insted thereof.
6.  Ah Master Doctor, the love I be to your capricious and rarelycircumcised experience, and likewise the confidence I repose in yourscrutinous taciturnitie, are both of such mighty and prevailingpower as I cannot conceale any thing from you, which you covet toknow. And therefore, if you wil sweare unto me by the crosse ofMonteson, that never (as you have already faithfully promised) youwill disclose a secret so admirable; I will relate it unto you, andnot otherwise. The Doctor sware, and sware againe, and then Bruno thusbegan.

计划指导

1.  While thus he continued in this extremity, it came to passe, thatthe Husband to Madam Giana fell sicke, and his debility of bodybeing such, as little, or no hope of life remained: he made his lastwill and testament, ordaining thereby, that his Sonne (alreadygrowne to indifferent stature) should be heire to all his Lands andriches, wherein he abounded very greatly. Next unto him, if he chancedto die without a lawfull heire, he substituted his Wife, whom mostdearely he affected, and so departed out of this life. Madam Gianabeing thus left a widdow; as commonly it is the custome of our CityDames, during the Summer season, she went to a house of her owne inthe Countrey, which was somewhat neere to poore Frederigoes Farme, andwhere he lived in such an honest kind of contented poverty.
2.  Great Soldane, I am the miserable and unfortunate Genevra, thatfor the space of sixe whole yeeres, have wandered through the world,in the habite of a man, falsely and most maliciously slaundered, bythis villainous Traytor Ambroginolo, and by this unkinde cruellhusband, betraied to his servant to be slaine, and left to be devouredby savage beasts. Afterward, desiring such garments as better fittedfor her, and shewing her breasts, she made it apparant before theSoldane and his assistants, that shee was the very same woman indeede.Then turning her selfe to Ambroginolo, with more then manly courage,she demanded of him, when, and where it was, that he lay with her,as (villainously) he was not ashamed to make his vaunt? But hee,having alreadie acknowledged the contrarie, being stricken dumbewith shamefull disgrace, was not able to utter one word.
3.  But now it is time (bright beauties) to returne whence we parted,and to follow our former order begun, because it may seeme we havewandered too farre. By this time the Sun had chased the Starre-lightfrom the heavens, and the shadie moisture from the ground, whenPhilostratus the King being risen, all the company arose likewise.When being come into the goodly Garden, they spent the time invarietie of sports, dining where they had supt the night before. Andafter that the Sunne was at his highest, and they had refreshedtheir spirits with a little slumbering, they sate downe (accordingto custome) about the faire Fountaine. And then the King commandedMadam Fiammettal that she should give beginning to the dayes Novels:when she, without any longer delaying, began:
4.  Menghino stayed with his troope, in a neere neighbouring house tothe Mayden, attending when the signall would be given: but Giovanniand his consorts, were ambushed somewhat further off from the house,and both saw when Jacomino went foorth to supper. Now Grinello and theChambermaide began to vary, which should send the other out of theway, till they had effected their severall invention; wheruponGrinello said to her. What maketh thee to walke thus about thehouse, and why doest thou not get thee to bed? And thou (quoth theMaide) why doest thou not goe to attend on our Master, and tarry forhis returning home? I am sure thou hast supt long agoe, and I knowno businesse here in the house for thee to doe. Thus (by no meanes)the one could send away the other, but either remained as the othershinderance.
5.  Nothing could be done at any time, to yeilde her liking orcontent: moreover, she was so waspish, nice and squemish, that whenshe cam into the royall Court of France, it was hatefull andcontemptible to hir. Whensoever she went through the streets, everything stunke and was noisome to her; so that she never did any thingbut stop her nose; as if all men or women she met withall; andwhatsoever else she lookt on, were stinking and offensive. But letus leave all further relation of her ill conditions, being every way(indeed) so bad, and hardly becomming any sensible body, that wecannot condemne them so much as we should.
6.  But when all the people were parted and gone, they met Friar Onyonat his Inne, where closely they discovered to him, what they had done,delivering him his Feather againe: which the yeare following, didyeeld him as much money, as now the Coales had done.

推荐功能

1.  A pretty while the Provoste stood musing, and at last saide. A placeMadame? where can be more privacie, then in your owne house? AlasSir (quoth she) you know that I have two Gentlemen my brethren, whocontinually are with me, and other of their friends beside: My housealso is not great, wherefore it is impossible to be there, exceptyou could be like a dumbe man, without speaking one word, or makingthe very least noyse; beside, to remaine in darkenesse, as if you wereblinde, and who can be able to endure all these? And yet (withoutthese) there is no adventuring, albeit they never come into myChamber: but their lodging is so close to mine, as there cannot anyword be spoken, be it never so low or in whispering manner, but theyheare it very easily. Madame said the Provoste, for one or two nights,I can make hard shift. Why Sir (quoth she) the matter onelyremaineth in you, for if you be silent and suffering, as already youhave heard, there is no feare at all of safty. Let me alone Madame,replyed the Provoste, I will be governed by your directions: but, inany case, let us begin this night. With all my heart, saide shee. Soappointing him how, and when hee should come; hee parted from her, andshee returned home to her house.
2.  OBEDIENT TO THEIR HUSBANDS
3.  Then let me live content, to be thus painde.
4.  Mithridanes envying the life and liberality of Nathan, andtravelling thither, with a setled resolution to kill him: chaunceth toconferre with Nathan unknowne. And being instructed by him, in whatmanner he might best performe the bloody deede, according as heegave direction, hee meeteth with him in a small Thicket or Woode,where knowing him to be the same man, that taught him how to take awayhis life: Confounded with shame, hee acknowledgeth his horribleintention, and becommeth his loyall friend.
5.   The Novell of Madame Eliza being finished, and some-what commendedby the King, in regard of the Tragicall conclusion; Philomena wasenjoyned to proceede next with her discourse. She being overcomewith much compassion, for the hard Fortunes of Noble Gerbino, andhis beautifull Princesse, after an extreame and vehement sighe, thusshe spake. My Tale (worthy Ladies) extendeth not to persons of so highbirth or quality, as they were of whom Madame Eliza gave you relation:yet (peradventure) it may prove to be no lesse pittifull. And now Iremember my selfe, Messina so lately spoken of, is the place wherethis accident also happened.
6.  Thus a wanton-headed Lady, could finde no other subject to worke hermocking folly on, but a learned Scholler, of whom shee made no morerespect, then any other ordinary man. Never remembring, that suchmen are expert (I cannot say all, but the greater part of them) tohelpe the frenzie of foolish Ladies, that must injoy their loosedesires, by Negromancy, and the Divelles meanes. Let it therefore(faire Ladies) be my loving admonition to you, to detest all unwomanlymocking and scorning, but more especiallie to Schollers.

应用

1.  But thought me happie, being in Love.
2.  WHEREBY (WITH SOME INDIFFERENT REASON) IT IS CONCLUDED, THAT
3.  IN JUST SCORNE AND MOCKERY OF SUCH JEALOUS HUSBANDS, THAT WILL BE
4、  Master Chappelet replyed; Say not so good Father, for albeit Ihave bene so oftentimes confessed, yet am I willing now to make agenerall confession, even of all sinnes comming to my remembrance,from the very day of my birth, until this instant houre of myshrift. And therefore I entreat you (holy Father) to make a particulardemand of everie thing, even as if I had never bene confessed atall, and to make no respect of my sicknesse: for I had rather beoffensive to mine owne flesh, then by favoring or allowing it ease, tohazard the perdition of my soule, which my Redeemer bought with soprecious a price.
5、  O Soveraigne Love by thee.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(1QxZSld926458))

  • 刘义丰 08-05

      That though I found the torment sharp, and great;

  • 张东武 08-05

      The man comming before him, hee demanded, if the accusationintimated against him, was true or no? Whereto the honest mananswered, that he could not denie the speaking of such words, anddeclared in what manner they were uttered. Presently the Inquisitor,most devoutly addicted to Saint John with the golden beard, saide;What? Doest thou make our Lord a drinker, and a curious quaffer ofwines, as if he were a glutton, a belly-god, or a Taverne haunter,as thou, and other drunkards are. Being an hypocrite, as thou art,thou thinkest this to be but a light matter, because it may seeme soin thine owne opinion: but I tell thee plainely, that it deservethfire and faggot, if I should proceede in justice to inflict it onthee: with these, and other such like threatning words, as also a verystearne and angry countenance, he made the man beleeve himselfe tobe an Epicure, and that hee denied the eternity of the soule;whereby he fell into such a trembling feare, as doubting indeede,least he should be burned; that, to be more mercifully dealt withal,he rounded him in the eare, and by secret meanes, so annointed hishands with Saint Johns golden grease (a verie singular remedie againstthe Disease Pestilentiall in covetous Priests, especially FriarsMinors, that dare touch no money) as the case became very quicklyaltered.

  • 玛乡 08-05

       Mervaile and amazement, encreased in Nicostratus far greater thenbefore, hearing him to avouch still so constantly what he had seene,no contradiction being able to alter him, which made him rashly sweareand say. I will see my selfe, whether this Peare-tree bee enchanted,or no: and such wonders to be seene when a man is up in it, as thouwouldst have us to beleeve. And being mounted up so hy, that they weresafe from his sodaine comming on them, Lydia had soone forgotten hersicknes, and the promised kisse cost her above twenty more, besideverie kinde and hearty embraces, as lovingly respected and entertainedby Pyrrhus. Which Nicostratus beholding aloft in the tree; cryed outto her, saying. Wicked woman, What doest thou meane? And thouvillain Pyrrhus, Darst thou abuse thy Lord, who hath reposed so muchtrust in thee? So, descending in haste downe againe, yet crying soto them still: Lydia replyed, Alas my Lord, Why do you raile andrave in such sort? So, he( found her seated as before, and Pyrrhuswaiting with dutiful reverence, even as when he climbed up the Tree:but yet he thought his sight not deceyved, for all their demure andformall behaviour, which made him walke up and downe, extreamelyfuming and fretting unto himselfe, and which in some milder mannerto qualifie, Pyrrhus spake thus to him.

  • 窦强办 08-05

      Perplexed with these various contradicting opinions, he waswilling divers times to turne home backe againe: yet such was theviolence of his love, and the power thereof prevailing against allsinister arguments; as he went to the grave, and removing theboordes covering it, whereinto he entred; and having despoiledScannadio of his garments, cloathed himselfe with them, and so laidhim down, having first covered the grave againe. Not long had heetarryed there, but he began to bethinke him, what manner of manScannadio was, and what strange reports had bene noised of him, notonely for ransacking dead mens graves in the night season, but manyother abhominable Villanies committed by him, which so fearfullyassaulted him; that his haire stoode on end, every member of himquaked, and every minute he imagined Scannadio rising, with intentto strangle him in the grave. But his fervent affection overcoming allthese idle feares, and lying stone still, as if he had beene thedead man indeede; he remained to see the end of his hope.

  • 沈厚富 08-04

    {  This done, and plainely perceiving that they were not heard orseene, either by the Lady, or any other: the Duke tooke a light in hishand, going on to the bed, where the Lady lay most sweetelysleeping; whom the more he beheld, the more he admired andcommended: but if in her garments shee appeared so pleasing, whatdid shee now in a bed of such state and Majestie? Being no way dauntedwith his so late committed sin, but swimming rather in surfet ofjoy, his hands all bloody, and his soule much more ugly; he laidehim downe on the bed by her, bestowing infinite kisses and embraces onher, she supposing him to be the Prince all this while, not openingher eyes to bee otherwise resolved. But this was not the delight heaymed at, neither did he thinke it safe for him, to delay time withany longer tarrying there: Wherefore, having his agents at hand fitand convenient for the purpose, they surprized her in such sort,that shee could not make any noyse or outcry, and carrying her throughthe same false posterne, whereat themselves had entred, laying herin a Princely litter; away they went with all possible speede, nottarrying in any place, untill they were arrived neere Athens. Butthither he would not bring her, because himselfe was a married man,but rather to a goodly Castle of his owne, not distant farre fromthe City; where he caused her to bee kept very secretly (to her nolittle greefe and sorrow) yet attended on and served in mosthonourable manner.

  • 郑天生 08-03

      But whatsoever he hath said concerning me, I make no account atall thereof, because he spake it in his drunkennesse, and as freely asI forgive him, even so (good Mother and kinde Brethren,) let meeentreate you to do the like.}

  • 游勇 08-03

      My Lord Abbot looking demurely on the Maide, and perceiving her tobe faire, feate, and lovely; felt immediately (although he was olde)no lesse spurring on to fleshly desires, then the young Monke beforehad done; whereupon he beganne to conferre thus privately withhimselfe. Why should I not take pleasure, when I may freely have it?Cares and molestations I endure every day, but sildome find suchdelights prepared for me. This is a delicate sweete young Damosell,and here is no eye that can discover me. If I can enduce her to doe asI would have her, I know no reason why I should gaine-say it. No mancan know it, or any tongue blaze it abroade; and sinne so concealed,is halfe pardoned. Such a faire fortune as this is, perhapshereafter will never befall me; and therefore I hold it wisedome, totake such a benefit when a man may enjoy it.

  • 李文正 08-03

      The Jew mounted on horse-backe, and made no lingering in his journeyto Rome; where being arrived, he was very honourably entertained byother Jewes dwelling in Rome. And during the time of his abiding there(without revealing to any one the reason of his comming thither)very heedfully he observed the maner of the Popes life, of theCardinals, Prelates, and all the Courtiers. And being a man verydiscreet and judicious, hee apparantly perceived, both by his owneeye, and further information of friends; that from the highest tothe lowest (without any restraint, remorse of conscience, shame, orfeare of punishment) all sinned in abhominable luxurie, and notnaturally onely, but in foule Sodomie, so that the credite ofStrumpets and Boyes was not small, and yet might be too easilyobtayned. Moreover, drunkards, belly-Gods, and servants of the paunch,more then of any thing else (even like brutish beasts after theirluxury) were every where to be met withall. And upon furtherobservation, hee saw all men so covetous and greedie of Coyne, thatevery thing was bought and solde for ready money, not onely theblood of men, but (in plaine termes) the faith of Christians, yea, andmatters of divinest qualities, how, or to whomsoever appertaining,were it for Sacrifices or Benefices, whereof was made no meanmerchandize, and more Brokers were there to be found (then in Parisattending upon all Trades) of manifest Symonie, under the nice name ofNegotiation, and for gluttony, not sustentation: even as if God hadnot knowne the signification of vocables, nor the intentions of wickedhearts, but would suffer himselfe to bee deceived by the outward namesof things, as wretched men commonly use to doe.

  • 吴明山 08-02

       THE CHORUS SUNG BY ALL

  • 张琚 07-31

    {  Truly (quoth Calandrino) well enough to mine owne thinking, yetnotwithstanding, I met with Nello but even now; and he told me, thatmy countenance was very much altred; Is it possible that I shouldbee sicke, and feele no paine or distaste in any part of me?Buffalmaco answered; I am not so skilfull in judgement, as to argue onthe Nature of distemper in the body: but sure I am, that thou hastsome daungerous inward impediment, because thou lookst (almost) like aman more then halfe dead.

  • 张效武 07-31

      It appeareth to me, that thou art verie desirous to come downehither on the ground; the best counsell that I can give thee, is toleape downe headlong, that by breaking thy necke (if thy fortune be sofaire) thy life and lothsome qualities ending together, I may sitand smile at thy deserved destruction. I have no other comfort to givethee, but only to boast my happinesse, in teaching thee the way toascend that Tower, and in thy descending downe (even by what means thywit can best devise) make a mockery of me, and say thou hast learnedmore, then all my Schollership could instruct thee.

提交评论