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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:岳东兴 大小:jMicrxGF67169KB 下载:lALwOpQl74815次
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日期:2020-08-04 17:20:04
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Hear me, O King, whoever you may be, and save me from the angerof the sea-god Neptune, for I approach you prayerfully. Any one whohas lost his way has at all times a claim even upon the gods,wherefore in my distress I draw near to your stream, and cling tothe knees of your riverhood. Have mercy upon me, O king, for I declaremyself your suppliant."
2.  When the bright star that heralds the approach of dawn began toshow. the ship drew near to land. Now there is in Ithaca a haven ofthe old merman Phorcys, which lies between two points that break theline of the sea and shut the harbour in. These shelter it from thestorms of wind and sea that rage outside, so that, when once withinit, a ship may lie without being even moored. At the head of thisharbour there is a large olive tree, and at no distance a fineoverarching cavern sacred to the nymphs who are called Naiads. Thereare mixing-bowls within it and wine-jars of stone, and the bees hivethere. Moreover, there are great looms of stone on which the nymphsweave their robes of sea purple- very curious to see- and at all timesthere is water within it. It has two entrances, one facing North bywhich mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes fromthe South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in byit, it is the way taken by the gods.
3.  On this Telemachus went by torch-light to the other side of theinner court, to the room in which he always slept. There he lay in hisbed till morning, while Ulysses was left in the cloister ponderingon the means whereby with Minerva's help he might be able to killthe suitors.
4.  "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."
5.  "Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has anyidea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are manypeople going about who tell such plausible stories that it is veryhard to see through them, but there is a style about your languagewhich assures me of your good disposition. Moreover you have toldthe story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as thoughyou were a practised bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whetheryou saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same timewith yourself, and perished there. The evenings are still at theirlongest, and it is not yet bed time- go on, therefore, with yourdivine story, for I could stay here listening till to-morrowmorning, so long as you will continue to tell us of your adventures."
6.  "If Jove were to bring this to pass," replied the stockman, "youshould see how I would do my very utmost to help him."

计划指导

1.  "My friend," answered Nestor, "you recall a time of much sorrow tomy mind, for the brave Achaeans suffered much both at sea, whileprivateering under Achilles, and when fighting before the great cityof king Priam. Our best men all of them fell there- Ajax, Achilles,Patroclus peer of gods in counsel, and my own dear son Antilochus, aman singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant. But we sufferedmuch more than this; what mortal tongue indeed could tell the wholestory? Though you were to stay here and question me for five years, oreven six, I could not tell you all that the Achaeans suffered, and youwould turn homeward weary of my tale before it ended. Nine longyears did we try every kind of stratagem, but the hand of heaven wasagainst us; during all this time there was no one who could comparewith your father in subtlety- if indeed you are his son- I canhardly believe my eyes- and you talk just like him too- no one wouldsay that people of such different ages could speak so much alike. Heand I never had any kind of difference from first to last neither incamp nor council, but in singleness of heart and purpose we advisedthe Argives how all might be ordered for the best.
2.  THUS, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on tothe town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at thegateway, and her brothers- comely as the gods- gathered round her,took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into thehouse, while she went to her own room, where an old servant,Eurymedusa of Apeira, lit the fire for her. This old woman had beenbrought by sea from Apeira, and had been chosen as a prize forAlcinous because he was king over the Phaecians, and the people obeyedhim as though he were a god. She had been nurse to Nausicaa, and hadnow lit the fire for her, and brought her supper for her into herown room.
3.  "Having so said she dived under the waves, whereon I turned backto the place where my ships were ranged upon the shore; and my heartwas clouded with care as I went along. When I reached my ship we gotsupper ready, for night was falling, and camped down upon the beach.
4.  "Happy Ulysses, son of Laertes," replied the ghost of Agamemnon,"you are indeed blessed in the possession of a wife endowed withsuch rare excellence of understanding, and so faithful to her weddedlord as Penelope the daughter of Icarius. The fame, therefore, ofher virtue shall never die, and the immortals shall compose a songthat shall be welcome to all mankind in honour of the constancy ofPenelope. How far otherwise was the wickedness of the daughter ofTyndareus who killed her lawful husband; her song shall be hatefulamong men, for she has brought disgrace on all womankind even on thegood ones."
5.  Then Penelope's heart sank within her, and for a long time she wasspeechless; her eyes filled with tears, and she could find noutterance. At last, however, she said, "Why did my son leave me?What business had he to go sailing off in ships that make long voyagesover the ocean like sea-horses? Does he want to die without leavingany one behind him to keep up his name?"
6.  And Telemachus answered, "I will tell you truly everything. There isno emnity between me and my people, nor can I complain of brothers, towhom a man may look for support however great his quarrel may be. Jovehas made us a race of only sons. Laertes was the only son ofArceisius, and Ulysses only son of Laertes. I am myself the only sonof Ulysses who left me behind him when he went away, so that I havenever been of any use to him. Hence it comes that my house is in thehands of numberless marauders; for the chiefs from all theneighbouring islands, Dulichium, Same, Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying court to my mother, who will neither say point blankthat she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end, so theyare making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so withmyself into the bargain. The issue, however, rests with heaven. But doyou, old friend Eumaeus, go at once and tell Penelope that I am safeand have returned from Pylos. Tell it to herself alone, and thencome back here without letting any one else know, for there are manywho are plotting mischief against me."

推荐功能

1.  "I will tell you the truth, my son," replied Ulysses. "It was thePhaeacians who brought me here. They are great sailors, and are in thehabit of giving escorts to any one who reaches their coasts. They tookme over the sea while I was fast asleep, and landed me in Ithaca,after giving me many presents in bronze, gold, and raiment. Thesethings by heaven's mercy are lying concealed in a cave, and I am nowcome here on the suggestion of Minerva that we may consult aboutkilling our enemies. First, therefore, give me a list of thesuitors, with their number, that I may learn who, and how many, theyare. I can then turn the matter over in my mind, and see whether wetwo can fight the whole body of them ourselves, or whether we mustfind others to help us."
2.  "Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of themagician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens,but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed herin the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
3.  Meanwhile Agelaus son of Damastor, Eurynomus, Amphimedon,Demoptolemus, Pisander, and Polybus son of Polyctor bore the bruntof the fight upon the suitors' side; of all those who were stillfighting for their lives they were by far the most valiant, for theothers had already fallen under the arrows of Ulysses. Agelaus shoutedto them and said, "My friends, he will soon have to leave off, forMentor has gone away after having done nothing for him but brag.They are standing at the doors unsupported. Do not aim at him all atonce, but six of you throw your spears first, and see if you cannotcover yourselves with glory by killing him. When he has fallen we neednot be uneasy about the others."
4.  Ulysses smiled at him and answered, "Fear not; Telemachus hassaved your life, that you may know in future, and tell other people,how greatly better good deeds prosper than evil ones. Go, therefore,outside the cloisters into the outer court, and be out of the way ofthe slaughter- you and the bard- while I finish my work here inside."
5.   He led the way as he spoke, and Minerva followed him. When they werewithin he took her spear and set it in the spear- stand against astrong bearing-post along with the many other spears of his unhappyfather, and he conducted her to a richly decorated seat under which hethrew a cloth of damask. There was a footstool also for her feet,and he set another seat near her for himself, away from the suitors,that she might not be annoyed while eating by their noise andinsolence, and that he might ask her more freely about his father.
6.  The old woman swore most solemnly that she would not, and when shehad completed her oath, she began drawing off the wine into jars,and getting the barley meal into the bags, while Telemachus wentback to the suitors.

应用

1.  Eumaeus answered, "Old man, no traveller who comes here with newswill get Ulysses' wife and son to believe his story. Nevertheless,tramps in want of a lodging keep coming with their mouths full oflies, and not a word of truth; every one who finds his way to Ithacagoes to my mistress and tells her falsehoods, whereon she takes themin, makes much of them, and asks them all manner of questions,crying all the time as women will when they have lost theirhusbands. And you too, old man, for a shirt and a cloak woulddoubtless make up a very pretty story. But the wolves and birds ofprey have long since torn Ulysses to pieces, or the fishes of thesea have eaten him, and his bones are lying buried deep in sand uponsome foreign shore; he is dead and gone, and a bad business it isfor all his friends- for me especially; go where I may I shall neverfind so good a master, not even if I were to go home to my motherand father where I was bred and born. I do not so much care,however, about my parents now, though I should dearly like to see themagain in my own country; it is the loss of Ulysses that grieves memost; I cannot speak of him without reverence though he is here nolonger, for he was very fond of me, and took such care of me thatwhereever he may be I shall always honour his memory."
2.  "Then," said Penelope, "if you are a god or have been sent here bydivine commission, tell me also about that other unhappy one- is hestill alive, or is he already dead and in the house of Hades?"
3.  So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."
4、  MEANWHILE Ulysses and the swineherd had lit a fire in the hut andwere were getting breakfast ready at daybreak for they had sent themen out with the pigs. When Telemachus came up, the dogs did not bark,but fawned upon him, so Ulysses, hearing the sound of feet andnoticing that the dogs did not bark, said to Eumaeus:
5、  "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."

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  • 张宇在 08-03

      He wept as he spoke and every one pitied him. But Medon and the bardPhemius had now woke up, and came to them from the house of Ulysses.Every one was astonished at seeing them, but they stood in themiddle of the assembly, and Medon said, "Hear me, men of Ithaca.Ulysses did not do these things against the will of heaven. I myselfsaw an immortal god take the form of Mentor and stand beside him. Thisgod appeared, now in front of him encouraging him, and now goingfuriously about the court and attacking the suitors whereon theyfell thick on one another."

  • 黄峰平 08-03

      "But I rushed at her with my sword drawn as though I would kill her,whereon she fell with a loud scream, clasped my knees, and spokepiteously, saying, 'Who and whence are you? from what place and peoplehave you come? How can it be that my drugs have no power to charm you?Never yet was any man able to stand so much as a taste of the herb Igave you; you must be spell-proof; surely you can be none other thanthe bold hero Ulysses, who Mercury always said would come here someday with his ship while on his way home form Troy; so be it then;sheathe your sword and let us go to bed, that we may make friendsand learn to trust each other.'

  • 苏尔图 08-03

       On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.

  • 殷高路 08-03

      "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."

  • 肖建华 08-02

    {  "As spoke he drove the ram outside, but when we were a little wayout from the cave and yards, I first got from under the ram's belly,and then freed my comrades; as for the sheep, which were very fat,by constantly heading them in the right direction we managed todrive them down to the ship. The crew rejoiced greatly at seeing thoseof us who had escaped death, but wept for the others whom theCyclops had killed. However, I made signs to them by nodding andfrowning that they were to hush their crying, and told them to get allthe sheep on board at once and put out to sea; so they went aboard,took their places, and smote the grey sea with their oars. Then,when I had got as far out as my voice would reach, I began to jeerat the Cyclops.

  • 安义士 08-01

      Then Minerva answered, "Sir, you have spoken well, and it will bemuch better that Telemachus should do as you have said; he, therefore,shall return with you and sleep at your house, but I must go back togive orders to my crew, and keep them in good heart. I am the onlyolder person among them; the rest are all young men of Telemachus' ownage, who have taken this voyage out of friendship; so I must return tothe ship and sleep there. Moreover to-morrow I must go to theCauconians where I have a large sum of money long owing to me. Asfor Telemachus, now that he is your guest, send him to Lacedaemon in achariot, and let one of your sons go with him. Be pleased also toprovide him with your best and fleetest horses."}

  • 朴信元 08-01

      As he spoke he went up to Ulysses and saluted him with his righthand; "Good day to you, father stranger," said he, "you seem to bevery poorly off now, but I hope you will have better times by andby. Father Jove, of all gods you are the most malicious. We are yourown children, yet you show us no mercy in all our misery andafflictions. A sweat came over me when I saw this man, and my eyesfilled with tears, for he reminds me of Ulysses, who I fear is goingabout in just such rags as this man's are, if indeed he is still amongthe living. If he is already dead and in the house of Hades, then,alas! for my good master, who made me his stockman when I was quiteyoung among the Cephallenians, and now his cattle are countless; noone could have done better with them than I have, for they have bredlike ears of corn; nevertheless I have to keep bringing them in forothers to eat, who take no heed of his son though he is in thehouse, and fear not the wrath of heaven, but are already eager todivide Ulysses' property among them because he has been away solong. I have often thought- only it would not be right while his sonis living- of going off with the cattle to some foreign country; badas this would be, it is still harder to stay here and be ill-treatedabout other people's herds. My position is intolerable, and I shouldlong since have run away and put myself under the protection of someother chief, only that I believe my poor master will yet return, andsend all these suitors flying out of the house."

  • 刘斌 08-01

      As she spoke she shed sleep over his eyes, and then went back toOlympus.

  • 刘健尚 07-31

       "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'

  • 丘国辉 07-29

    {  To which Ulysses answered, "Good luck to you too my friend, andmay the gods grant you every happiness. I hope you will not miss thesword you have given me along with your apology."

  • 罗凯茵 07-29

      At last, however, Ulysses said, "Wife, we have not yet reached theend of our troubles. I have an unknown amount of toil still toundergo. It is long and difficult, but I must go through with it,for thus the shade of Teiresias prophesied concerning me, on the daywhen I went down into Hades to ask about my return and that of mycompanions. But now let us go to bed, that we may lie down and enjoythe blessed boon of sleep."

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