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日期:2020-08-06 01:22:46
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Saladine, and they that were with him, spake the Latine tonguevery readily, by which meanes they were the better understoode; andThorello seemed (in their judgement) to bee the most gracious,compleate, and best spoken Gentleman, as ever they met with in alltheir journey. It appeared also (on the other side) to SigniourThorello, that his guests were men of great merit, and worthy ofmuch more esteeme, then there he could use towards them: wherefore, itdid highly distast him, that he had no more friends there this nightto keepe them company, or himselfe better provided for theirentertainment, which hee intended (on the morrow) to recompence withlarger amends at dinner.
2.  I being then made of flesh and blood, and so derived from yourselfe; having had also so little benefit of life, that I am yet in thespring, and blooming time of my blood: by either of these reasons, Imust needs be subject to naturall desires, wherein such knowledge as Ihave once already had, in the estate of my marriage, perhaps mightmove a further intelligence of the like delights, according to thebetter ability of strength, which exceeding all capacity ofresistance, induced a second motive to affection, answerable to mytime and youthfull desires, and so (like a yong woman) I became cameagaine; yet did I strive, even with all my utmost might, and bestvertuous faculties abiding in me, no way to disgrace either you ormy selfe, as (in equall censure) yet have I not done. But Nature isabove all humane power, and Love commanded by Nature, hath prevailedfor Love, joyning with Fortune: in meere pitty and commiseration of myextreame wrong, I found them both most benigne and gracious,teaching mee a way secret enough, whereby I might reach the heightof my desires, howsoever you became instructed, or (perhaps) foundit out by accident; so it was, and I deny it not.
3.  ADMONISHING ALL LADIES AND GENTLEWOMEN, THAT ARE DESIROUS TO
4.  When the Gentlewoman heard this, despairing of any consolation, orrevenge for her wrongs, shee resolved to checke the Kings deniall ofjustice, and comming before him weeping, spake in this manner. Sir,I presume not into your presence, as hoping to have redresse by you,for divers dishonourable injuries done unto me; but, as fullsatisfaction for them, doe but teach me how you suffer such vileabuses, as daily are offered to your selfe. To the end, that beingtherein instructed by you, I may the more patiently beare mine owne;which (as God knoweth) I would bestow on you very gladly, becauseyou know so well how to endure them.
5.  Then began hee to recount, the whole occasion of this straungeconflict in him, what a maine battaile hee had with his privatethoughts, confessing that they got the victory, causing him to diehourely for the love of Sophronia, and affirming withall, that indue acknowledgement, how greatly hee had transgressed against thelawes of friendship, he thought no other penance sufficient for him,but onely death, which he willingly expected every houre, and with allhis heart would gladly bid welcome.
6.  SHEWETH, HOW BENEFICIALL A SODAINE AND INGENIOUS ANSWERE

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1.  Now as concerning Biancafiore, when she saw that Salabettoreturned not againe to Palermo, she beganne to grow somewhatabashed, as halfe suspecting that which followed. After she hadtarried for him above two moneths space, and perceived hee came not,nor any tydings heard of him: shee caused the Broker to breake openthe Magazine, casting forth the Buttes or Barrels, which shee beleevedto bee full of good Oyles. But they were all filled with Seawater,each of them having a small quantity of Oyle floating on the toppe,onely to serve when a tryall should bee made. And then unbinding thePackes, made up in formall and Merchantable manner: there wasnothing else in them, but Logges and stumpes of Trees, wrapthandsomely in hurdles of Hempe and Tow; onely two had Cloathes inthem. So that (to bee briefe) the whole did not value two hundredCrownes: which when she saw, and observed how cunningly she wasdeceived: a long while after shee sorrowed, for repaying backe thefive hundred Florines, and folly in lending a thousand more, usingit as a Proverbe alwaies after to hit selfe: That whosoever dealt witha Tuscane, had neede to have sound sight and judgement. So remainingcontented (whither she would or no) with her losse: she plainlyperceyved, that although she lived by cheating others, yet now atthe length she had mette with her match.
2.  You may well imagine, that Aniolliero was now enraged beyond allpatience, to see himselfe both robde of his money, and overbornewith presumptuous language: wherefore, without making any morereplications, he gave the spurre to his horse, and rode away towardsTorreniero. Now fell Fortarigo into a more knavish intention againstAniolliero, and being very speedy in running, followed apace after himin his shirt, crying out still aloude to him all the way, to let himhave his Doublet againe. Aniolliero riding on very fast, to free hiseares from this idle importunity, it fortuned that Fortarigo espieddivers countrey Pezants, laboring in the fields about their businesse,and by whom Aniolliero (of necessity) must passe: To them he cryed outso loude as he could; Stay the thiefe, Stop the Thiefe, he ridesaway so fast, having robde me.
3.  The Marquesse of Montferrat was a worthy and valiant Knight, whobeing Captaine Generall for the Church, the necessary service requiredhis company on the Seas, in a goodly Army of the Christians againstthe Turkes. Upon a day, in the Court of King Philip, sirnamed theone eyed King (who likewise made preparation in France, for a royallassistance to that expedition) as many speeches were delivered,concerning the valour and manhoode of this Marquesse: it fortuned,that a Knight was then present, who knew him very familiarly, and hegave an addition to the former commendation, that the whole worldcontained not a more equall couple in marriage, then the Marquesse andhis Lady. For, as among all knights, the Marquesse could hardly beparaleld for Armes and Honour; even so his wife, in comparison ofall other Ladies, was scarcely matchable for beauty and vertue.Which words were so weighty in the apprehension of King Philip, thatsodainly (having as yet never seen her) he began to affect her veryearnestly, concluding to embarke himselfe at Gennes or Genoua, thereto set forward on the intended voyage, and journying thither byland, hee would shape some honest excuse to see the Lady Marquesse,whose Lord being then from home, opinion perswaded him over fondly,that he should easily obtaine the issue of his amorous desire.
4.  At one time among the rest, as she was making the same motion againeto her Husband, that his friend might be lodged in better manner:Gossip John thus spake to her. Good Zita Carapresa, never molestyour selfe for me, because I lodge to mine owne contentment, and somuch the rather, in regard that whensoever I list: I can convert myMule into a faire young woman, to give mee much delight in thenight-season, and afterward make her a Mule againe: thus am I neverwithout her company.
5.  Frederigo, who was no meane man in his Mistresses favor, andtherefore these private meetings the more welcome to him; received asummons or assignation from her, to be there on such a night, when hirhusband had no intent of comming thither. There they supped merrilytogether, and (no doubt) did other things, nothing appertaining to ourpurpose, she both acquainting, and well instructing him, in a dozen(at the least) of her Husbands devout prayers. Nor did shee make anyaccount, or Frederigo either, that this should be the last time oftheir meeting, because (indeede) it was not the first: and therforethey set downe an order and conclusion together (because theChambermaide must be no longer the messenger) in such manner as youshall heare.
6.  I cannot tell what was that rare delight,

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1.  The Clearke comming to the house of Belcolore, found her sittingat dinner with her Husband, and delivering her the Pestell and Morter,performed the rest of Sir Simons message. Belcolore hearing the Cloakedemaunded, stept up to make answere: But Bentivegna, seeming (by hislookes) to be much offended, roughly replyed. Why how now wife? Is notSir Simon our especiall friend, and cannot he be pleasured without apawne? I protest upon my word, I could find in my heart to smitethee for it. Rise quickely thou wert best, and send him backe hisCloake; with this warning hereafter, that whatsoever he will have,be it your poore Asse, or any thing else being ours, let him haveit: and tell him (Master Clearke) he may command it. Belcolore rosegrumbling from the Table, and fetching the Cloake forth of theChest, which stood neere at hand in the same roome; shee deliveredit to the Clearke, saying. Tell Sir Simon from me, and boldly sayyou heard me speake it: that I make a vow to my selfe, he shallnever make use of my Morter hereafter, to beat any more of hissawcinesse in, let my Husband say whatsoever he will, I speake theword, and will performe it.
2.  Now although Titus was confounded with shame, to yeeld consent, thatSophronia should be accepted as his wife, and used many obstinateresistances: yet notwithstanding, Love pleading on the one sidepowerfully, and Gisippus as earnestly perswading on the other, thus heanswered. Gisippus, I know not what to say, neither how to behave myselfe in this election, concerning the fitting of mine contentment, orpleasing thee in thy importunate perswasion. But seeing thy liberalityis so great, as it surmounteth all reason or shame in me, I will yeeldobedience to thy more then noble nature. Yet let this remaine forthine assurance, that I doe not receive this grace of thine, as aman not sufficiently understanding, how I enjoy from thee, not onelyher whom most of all I doe affect, but also doe hold my very life ofthee. Grant then you greatest Gods (if you be the Patrones of thismine unexpected felicitie) that with honor and due respect, I mayhereafter make apparantly knowne: how highly I acknowledge this thywonderfull favour, in being more mercifull to me, then I could be tomy selfe.
3.  WHEREIN IS MANIFESTLY DISCERNED, THAT IF LOVE BE DRIVEN TO A NARROW
4.  They were not bred to prey so base and low,
5.   Signior Thorello, if with true affection you love your Wife, andmisdoubt her marriage to some other man: I protest unto you, by thesupreme powers, that you deserve no reprehension in any mannerwhatsoever. For, of all the Ladyes that ever I have seene, she isthe onely woman, whose carriage, vertues, and civile speaking (settingaside beauty, which is but a fading flowre) deserveth mostgraciously to be respected, much more to be affected in the highestdegree. It were to me no meane favour of our Gods, (seeing Fortunedirected your course so happily hither) that for the short or longtime we have to live, we might reigne equally together in theseKingdomes under my subjection. But if such grace may not be grantedme, yet, seeing it stands mainly upon the perill of your life, to beat Pavia againe by your own limitted time, it is my chiefestcomfort, that I am therewith acquainted, because I intended to haveyou conveighed thither, yea, even into your owne house, in suchhonourable order as your vertues doe justly merit, which in regardit cannot be so conveniently performed, but as I have already informedyou, and as the necessity of the case urgently commandeth; accept itas it may be best accomplished.
6.  If this thou wilt not grant, be yet so kinde,

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1.  Most highly pleased was Amarigo with these glad newes, and goingto the Ambassadour Phineo, in teares excused himselfe (so well as hecould) for his severity, and craving pardon; assured him, that ifTheodoro would accept his Daughter in marriage, willingly he wouldbestow her on him. Phineo allowed his excuses to be tollerable, andsaide beside; If my Son will not marry your Daughter, then let thesentence of death be executed on him. Amarigo and Phineo being thusaccorded, they went to poore Theodoro, fearefully looking every minutewhen he should dye, yet joyfull that he had found his Father, whopresently moved the question to him. Theodoro hearing that Violentashould bee his Wife, if he would so accept her: was over come withsuch exceeding joy, as if he had leapt out of hell into Paradise;confessing, that no greater felicity could befall him, if Violenta herselfe were so well pleased as he.
2.  After he had thus discoursed with himselfe, remembring Sophronia,and converting his former allegations, into a quite contrarie sense,in utter detestation of them, and guided by his idle appetite, thus hebegan againe. The lawes of love are of greater force, then any otherwhatsoever, they not only breake the bands of friendship, but eventhose also of more divine consequence. How many times hath it binnoted, the father to affect his own daughter, the brother hissister, and the stepmother her son in law, matters far more monstrous,then to see one friend love the wife of another, a case happeningcontinually? Moreover, I am yong, and youth is wholly subjected to thepassions of Love: is it reasonable then, that those should be bardfrom me, which are fitting and pleasing to Love? Honest things, belongto men of more years and maturity, then I am troubled withall, and Ican covet none, but onely those wherein Love is directer. The beautyof Sophronia is worthy of generall love, and if I that am a yongman dolove her, what man living can justly reprove me for it? Shold not Ilove her, because she is affianced to Gisippus? That is no matter tome, I ought to love her, because she is a woman, and women werecreated for no other occasion, but to bee Loved. Fortune had sinned inthis case, and not I, in directing my frends affection to her,rather then any other; and if she ought to be loved, as herperfections do challenge, Gisippus understanding that I affect her,may be the better contented that it is I, rather then any other.
3.  There shalt thou finde two Capons drest,
4、  This Master Chappelet, was of so good and commendable life; that,being a Notarie, he held it in high disdaine, that any of hisContractes (although he made but few) should be found withoutfalshoode. And looke how many soever hee dealt withall, he would beurged and required thereto, offering them his paines and travailefor nothing, but to bee requited otherwise then by money; whichprooved to bee his much larger recompencing, and returned to him thefarre greater benefit. Hee tooke the onely pleasure of the world, tobeare false witnesse, if hee were thereto entreated, and(oftentimes) when hee was not requested at all. Likewise because inthose times, great trust and beleefe was given to an oath, he makingno care or conscience to be perjured: greatly advantaged himselfe byLaw suites, in regard that many matters relyed upon his oath, anddelivering the truth according to his knowledge.
5、  In this towne of Chasteau Guillaume, lived a young Lady, who was awiddow, so beautifull and comely of her person, as sildome was seene amore lovely creature. The Marquesse Azzo most dearely affected her,and (as his choysest Jewell of delight) gave her that house to livein, under the terrace whereof poore Rinaldo made his shelter. Itchaunced the day before, that the Marquesse was come thither,according to his frequent custome, to weare away that night in hercompany, she having secretly prepared a Bath for him, and a costlysupper beside. All things being ready, and nothing wanting but theMarquesse his presence: suddenly a Post brought him such Letters,which commanded him instantly to horsebacke, and word hee sent tothe Lady, to spare him for that night, because urgent occasions calledhim thence, and hee rode away immediately.

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  • 林坚飞 08-05

      She returning with this answer unto her Mistresse, Francescaremained in expectation, what the issue of these fond attemptes inthem, would sort unto. When night was come, and the middle hourethereof already past, Alessandro Chiarmontesi, having put off allother garments to his doublet and hose; departed secretly from hislodging, walking towards the Church-yard, where Scannadio lay in hisgrave: but by the way as he went, hee became surprized with diversdreadfull conceites and imaginations, and questioned with himselfethus.

  • 董洪亮 08-05

      The Abbesse being seated in the Chapter house, and all the otherNunnes then called before her, who minded nothing else but the pooreoffending Sister: she began to give her very harsh and vilespeeches, as never any transgressor suffered the like, and as to herwho had (if it should be openly knowne abroad) contaminated by herlewde life and actions, the sanctity and good renowne of the wholeMonastery, and threatned her with very severe chastisement. PooreIsabella, confounded with feare and shame, as being no way able toexcuse her fault, knew not what answer to make, but standing silent,made her case compassionable to all the rest, even thosehard-hearted Sisters which betrayed her.

  • 柴垛 08-05

       And to the end, that my speeches may not savor of any untruthagainst them; these men which I speake of, have not any habite atall of religious men, but onely the colour of their garments, andwhereas they in times past, desired nothing more then the salvation ofmens soules; these fresher witted fellowes, covet after women andwealth, and employ all their paines by their whispering confessions,and figures of painted fearefull examples, to affright and terrifieunsetled and weake consciences, by horrible and blasphemousspeeches; yet adding perswasion withall, that their sinnes may bepurged by Almes-deedes and Masses. To the end, that such as creditthem in these their dayly courses, being guided more by apparance ofdevotion, then any true compunction of heart, to escape severepenances by them enjoyned: may some of them bring bread, otherswine, others coyne, all of them matter of commoditie and benefit,and simply say, these gifts are for the soules of their good friendsdeceased.

  • 尚昱 08-05

      The fond yong woman, more covetously addicted to gayne andcommodity, then looking into the knavish intention of her Gossip John;began to grow greatly offended.

  • 戈别基 08-04

    {  When Signior Ansaldo heard her demand, and the offer besidethereuppon made him (although it seemed no easie matter, but a thingmeerly impossible to be done) he considered advisedly, that she madethis motion to no other end, but onely to bereave him of all his hope,ever to enjoy what so earnestly hee desired: neverthelesse, he wouldnot so give it utterly over, but would needs approve what could bedone. Heereupon, hee sent into divers partes of the world, to find outany one that was able to advise him in this doubtfull case. In theend, one was brought to him, who beeing well recompenced for hispaines, by the Art of Nigromancie would under take to do it. Withhim Signior Ansaldo covenanted, binding himselfe to pay a greatsumme of mony, upon performance of so rare a deed, awaiting (inhopefull expectation) for the month of januaries comming. It beingcome, and the weather then in extreamity of cold, every beingcovered with ice and snow, the Magitian prevailed so by his Art,that after the Christmas Holy dayes were past, and the Calends ofjanuary entred: in one night, and without the Cittie Wals, thegoodliest Garden of flowers and fruites, was sodainely sprung up, as(in opinion of such as beheld it) never was the like seen before.Now Ladies, I think I need not demand the question, whether SigniorAnsaldo were wel pleased, or no, who going to beholde t, saw it mostplenteously stored, with al kind of fruit trees, flowers, herbes andplants, as no one could be named, that was wanting in this artificiallgarden. And having gathered some pretty store of them, secretly hesent them to Madam Dianora, inviting hir to come see her Garden,perfected according to her owne desire, and uppon view thereof, toconfesse the integrity of his love to her; considering andremembring withall, the promise shee had made him under solemneoath, that she might be reputed for a woman of her word.

  • 郭寿宝 08-03

      But truth lives not in men,}

  • 唐皇 08-03

      This Lady, had all the most absolute perfections, both of favour andfeature, as could be wished in any woman, young, queintly disposed,and of admirable understanding, more (perhappes) then was requisite inso weake a body. Continuing thus in Court with the King her Father,who loved her beyond all his future hopes; like a Lady of great andglorious magnificence, she lived in all delights and pleasure. Shewell perceiving, that her Father thus exceeding in his affection toher, had no minde at all of re-marrying her, and holding it mostimmodest in her, to solicite him with any such suite: concluded in hermindes private consultations, to make choise of some one especiallfriend or favourite (if Fortune would prove so furtherous to her) whomshe might acquaint secretly, with her sober, honest, and familiarpurposes. Her Fathers Court being much frequented, with plentifullaccesse of brave Gentlemen, and others of inferiour quality, ascommonly the Courts ofKings and Princes are, whose carriage and demeanor she veryheedfully observed. There was a young Gentleman among all the rest,a servant to her Father, and named Cuiscardo, a man not derived fromany great descent by blood, yet much more Noble by vertue andcommandable behaviour, then appeared in any of the other, none pleasedher opinion, like as he did; so that by often noting his parts andperfections, her affections being but a glowing sparke at first,grew like a Bavin to take Rame, yet kept so closely as possibly shecould; as Ladies are warie enough in their love.

  • 陈叶林 08-03

      The base-minded Knight, coveting to have the Horse, and yet not topart with any money, sent for the Magnifico, desiring to buy his fayreGelding of him, because he hoped to have him of free gift. TheMagnifico hearing this request, was very joyfull, and thus answered;Sir, if you would give me all the wealth which you possesse in thisworld, I wil not sell you my horse, rather I wil bestow him on youas a Gentlemans gift: but yet upon this condition, that before youhave him delivered, I may with your license, and in your presencespeake a few words to your vertuous Ladie, and so farre off indistance from you, as I may not be heard by any, but onely herselfe. Signior Francesco, wholly conducted by his base avariciousdesire, and meaning to make a scorne at the Magnifico, made answer,that he was well contented to let him speak with her when he would;and leaving him in the great Hall of the house, went to his wivesChamber, and told her how easily he might enjoy the horse,commanding her forthwith to come and heare what he could say to her,only she should abstaine, and not returne him any answer. The Ladywith a modest blush, much condemned this folly in him, that hiscovetousnes should serve as a cloake to cover any unfitting speecheswhich her chaste eares could never endure to heare. Neverthelessebeing to obey her husbands will, she promised to do it, and followedhim down into the Hall, to heare what the Magnifico would say.Againe he there confirmed the bargaine made with her husband, andsitting downe by her in a corner of the Hall, farre enough off fromany ones hearing, taking her curteously by the hand, thus he spake.

  • 严立学 08-02

       Then the Children began to cry, saying; that they would tarriestil by the good olde man, because he loved them better then theirMaster did; whereat both the Lady and the Count began to smile. TheCount, a poore Begger, and not as Father to so great a Lady, arose,and did her humble reverence, because she was now a Noble Woman,conceyving wonderfull joy in his soule, to see her so faire and goodlya creature: yet could she take no knowledge of him, Age, want, andmisery had so mightily altered him; his head all white, his beardwithout any comly forme, his Garments so poore, and his face sowrinkled, leane and meager, that he seemed rather some Carter, thena Count. And Gianetta perceiving that when her Children were fetchtaway, they returned againe to the olde man, and would not leave him,she desired their Maister to let them alone.While thus the Children continued making much of the good olde man,Lord Andrew Mandevile, Father to Sir Roger, came into the Hall, asbeing so willed to doe by the Childrens Schoolemaster. He being ahastie-minded man, and one that ever-despised Gianetta before, butmuch more since her marriage to his sonne, angerly said; Let themalone with a mischeefe, and so befall them, their best company oughtto bee with beggers, for so they are bred and borne by the Mothersside: and therefore it is no mervaile, if like will to like, a beggersbrats to keepe company with beggers. The Count hearing thesecontemptible wordes, was not a little greeved thereat; and althoughhis courage was greater then his poore condition would permit him toexpresse; yet, clouding all injuries with noble patience, hangingdowne his head, and shedding many a salt teare, endured this reproach,as hee had done many, both before and after.

  • 王恒涛 07-31

    {  MIGHTY PREVAILING, POWER OF LOVE POWER OF LOVE

  • 刘芳俊 07-31

      But as Fortune is infinite in her fagaries, never acting disaster soclosely, but as cunningly discovereth it againe: so it came topasse, that within a few dayes following, the Grecian Woman that haddelivered the poyson to Ninetta, for such another deede ofdamnation, was apprehended even in the action. And being put upon hetortures, among many other horrid villanies her committed, sheconfessed the empoysoning of Restagnone, and every particle theretoappertaining. Whereupon, the Duke of Candie, without any noyse orpublication, setting a strong guard (in the night time) about thehouse of Folco, where Ninetta then was lodged; there sodainly theyseized on her, and upon examination, in maintenance of desperaterevenge, voluntarily confessed the fact, and what else concerned theoccasion of his death, by the wrongs which he had offered her.

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