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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:田哲慎 大小:NVkp8FCi25284KB 下载:DCcuvYvz71058次
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日期:2020-08-06 19:52:06
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  What sweet content due understanding lends:
2.  WHEREIN IS CONTAINED AND EXPRESSED, THE LIBERALITY AND
3.  When this came to the hearing of Lysimachus, it was very greatlydispleasing to him, because now he saw himselfe utterly deprived of alhope to attaine the issue of his desire, if Hormisda receivedCassandra in marriage. Yet being a very wise and worthy man, hedissembled his distaste, and began to consider on some apt meanes,whereby to disappoint the marriage once more, which he foundimpossible to be done, except it were by way of rape or stealth. Andthat did not appeare to him any difficult matter, in regard of hisOffice and Authority: onely it would seeme dishonest in him, by givingsuch an unfitting example. Neverthelesse, after long deliberation,honour gave way to love, and resolutely he concluded to steale heraway, whatsoever became of it.
4.  Madame Fiammetta, whose lockes of haire were curled, long, andlike golden wiers, hanging somewhat downe over her white anddelicate shoulders, her visage round, wherein the Damaske Rose andLilly contended for priority, the eyes in her head, resembling thoseof the Faulcon messenger, and a dainty mouth; her lippes lookinglike two little Rubyes, with a commendable smile thus she replyed.
5.  So lifting up the Cudgell, he gave him therewith halfe a scoregood bastinadoes, laying them on soundly, both on his armes andshoulders: and Egano feeling the smart of them, durst not speake oneWorde, but fled away from him so fast as hee could, Anichino stillfollowing, and multiplying many other injurious speeches againsthim, with the Epithites of Strumpet, lustfull and insatiate Woman.Go thou lewde beast (quoth he) most unworthy the title of a Lady, orto be Wife unto so good a natured man, as my Mayster is, to whom Iwill reveale thy most ungracious incivility to Morrow, that he maypunish thee a little better then I have done.
6.  Remember (Pyrrhus) that Fortune presents her selfe but once beforeany one, with cheerefull lookes, and her lappe wide open of richestfavours, where if choice be not quickely made, before she folde it up,not quic and turn her backe; let no complaint afterward be made ofher, if the Fellow that had so faire an offer, proove to be miserable,wretched, and a Begger, only thorow his owne negligence. Beside,what else hath formerly bin saide, there is now no such neede ofloyaltie in servants to their Ladies, as should be among deare Friendsand Kindred: but servants ought rather (as best they may) be such totheir Masters, as they are to them. Doest thou imagine, that if thouhadst a faire Wife, Mother, Daughter, or Sister, pleasing in the eyeof our Nicostratus; he would stand on such nice tearmes of duty orLoyaltie, as now thou doest to his Ladie? Thou wert a verie foole torest so perswaded. Assure thy selfe, that if entreaties and fairemeans might not prevalle, force, and compulsion (whatsoever ensuedthereon) woulde winne the masterie. Let us then use them, and thecommodities unto them belonging, as they would us and ours. Use thebenefit of thy Fortune, and beware of abusing her favour. She yetsmiles on thee; but take heede least she turne her backe, it will thenbe over-late to repent thy folly. And if my Ladie die through thydisdaine, be assured, that thou canst not escape with life, besideopen shame and disgrace for ever.

计划指导

1.  Upon this his private frequentation with the Abbot, at last heobserved, that Ferando had a very beautifull woman to his Wife, withwhom he grew so deeply in love, as he had no other meditationseither by day or night, but how to become acceptable in her favour.Neverthelesse, he concealed his amorous passions privately tohimselfe, and could plainely perceive, that although Ferando (in allthings else) was meerely a simple fellow, and more like an Idiot, thenof any sensible apprehension: yet was he wise enough in loving hisWife, keeping her carfully out of all company, as one (indeede) veryjealous, least any should kisse her, but onely himselfe, which drovethe Abbot into despaire, for ever attaining the issue of his desire.Yet being subtill, crafty, and cautelous, he wrought so on theflexible nature of Ferando, that hee brought his wife with himdivers dayes to the Monasterie; where they walked in the goodlyGarden, discoursing on the beatitudes of eternall life, as also themost holy deedes of men and women, long since departed out of thislife, in mervailous civill and modest manner. Yet all these were buttraines to a further intention, for the Abbot must needes be herghostly Father, and she come to be confessed by him; which the fooleFerando tooke as an especiall favour, and therefore he gave hisconsent the sooner.
2.  And what is he, knowing your choise and vertuous dispositions, sopowerfull in their owne prevailing, that wanton words cannotmisguide your wayes, no nor the terror of death it selfe, that dareinsinuate a distempred thought? But admit, that some slight or shallowjudgements, hearing you (perhaps sometimes) talke of such amorousfollies, should therefore suspitiously imagine you to be faulty, orelse you would bee more sparing of speech? Their wit and censure areboth alike, savouring rather of their owne vile nature, who wouldbrand others with their basebred imperfections. Yet ther is anotherconsideration beside, of som great injury offered to mine honor, andwhereof I know not how you can acquit your selves.
3.  They which before had surprized Pedro, desiring now to shift fortheir owne safetie, left him standing quaking in his shirt, and soranne away mainely to defend themselves. Which the new crewperceyving, and that their number farre exceeded the other: theyfollowed to robbe them of what they had gotten, accounting it as apresent purchase for them. Which when Pedro perceyved, and saw nonetarrying to prey uppon him; hee put on his cloathes againe, andmounting on his owne Horse, gallopped that way, which Angelinabefore had taken: yet could he not descry any tracke or path, or somuch as the footing of a Horse; but thought himselfe in sufficientsecurity, being rid of them that first seized on him, and also ofthe rest, which followed in the pursuite of them.
4.  It so fell out, that in the continuance of this warre, the Queene ofFrance fell into a grievous sicknesse, and perceiving her selfe tobe at the point of death, shee became very penitently sorrowfull forall her sinnes, earnestly desiring that shee might be confessed by theArchbishop of Roane, who was reputed to be an holy and vercuous man.In the repetition of her other offences; she revealed what great wrongshe had done to the Count D'Angiers, resting not so satisfied, withdisclosing the whole matter to him alone; but also confessed thesame before many other worthy persons, and of great honour, entreatingthem to worke so with the King, that (if the Count were yet living, orany of his Children) they might be restored to their former honouragaine.
5.  No imbarment remained, but remembrance of the Marquesse, and thatbeing summoned to her more advised consideration, her youth and beautystood up as conscious accusers, for blemishing her honour and fairerepute, with lewd and luxurious life, far unfit for a Lady of herdegree, and well worthy of generall condemnation. What should Ifurther say? upon a short conference with her Chamber-maide,repentance for sinne past, and solemne promise of a constantconversion, thus shee delivered her minde to Rinaldo.
6.  THE FOURTH DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL

推荐功能

1.  Our frolicke Baker perceiving, that Messer Geri Spina and theother Ambassadors, used every morning to passe by his doore, andafterward to returne backe the same way: seeing the season to besomewhat hot and soultry, he tooke it as an action of kindnesse andcourtesie, to make them an offer of tasting his white wine. But havingrespect to his owne meane degree, and the condition of Messer Geri:hee thought it farre unfitting for him, to be so forward in suchpresumption; but rather entred into consideration of some such meanes,whereby Messer Geri might bee the inviter of himselfe to taste hisWine. And having put on him a trusse or thin doublet, of very whiteand fine Linnen cloath, as also breeches, and an apron of the same,and a white cap upon his head, so that he seemed rather to be aMiller, then a Baker: at such times as Messer Geri and the Ambassadorsshould daily passe by, hee set before his doore a new Bucket offaire water, and another small vessell of Bologna earth (as new andsightly as the other) full of his best and choisest white Wine, withtwo small Glasses, looking like silver, they were so cleare. Downehe sate, with all this provision before him, and emptying his stomacketwice or thrice, of some clotted flegmes which seemed to offend it:even as the Gentlemen were passing by, he dranke one or two rousesof his Wine so heartily, and with such a pleasing appetite, as mighthave moved a longing (almost) in a dead man.
2.  for none other meete,
3.  No doubt, but that these were strange newes to Alessandro, andseemed meerely as a miracle to him. What shee was, he knew not, but inregard of her traine and company, hee reputed her to be both noble andrich, as also she was wonderfull faire and beautifull. His ownefortunes stood out of future expectation by his kinsmens overthrow,and his great losses in England; wherefore, upon an opportunity sofairely offered, he held it no wisedome to returne refusall, butaccepted her gracious motion, and referred all to her disposing.Shee arising out of her bed, called him to a little Table standing by,where hung a faire Crucifixe upon the wall; before which, andcalling him to witnesse, that suffered such bitter and cruell tormentson his Crosse, putting a Ring upon his finger, there she faithfullyespoused him, refusing all the world, to be onely his: which beingon either side confirmed solemnly, by an holy Vow, and chastekisses; shee commanded him backe to his Chamber, and she returned toher bed againe, sufficiently satisfied with her Loves acceptation, andso they journied on till they came to Rome.
4.  Isabella, living in expectation of his returne, and perceiving hisstay to her was so offensive long: made many demands to herBrethren, into what parts they had sent him, that his tarrying wasso quite from all wonted course. Such was her importunate speechesto them, that they taking it very discontentedly, one of them returnedher this frowning answer. What is your meaning Sister, by so manyquestionings after Lorenzo? What urgent affaires have you with him,that makes you so impatient upon his absence? If hereafter you makeany more demands for him, we shall shape you such a reply, as willbe but little to your liking. At these harsh words, Isabella fell intoabundance of teares, where-among she mingled many sighes andgroanes, such as were able to overthrow a farre stronger constitution:so that, being full of feare and dismay, yet no way distrusting herbrethrens cruell deede; she durst not question any more after him.
5.   Master Doctor humbly entreated pardon, and that they would notrevile him any more, labouring to appease them by the best words hecould use, as fearing least they should publish this great disgrace ofhim. And whereas (before) he gave them gracious welcomes; now heredoubled them with farre greater courtesies, feasting them daily athis own table, and evermore delighting in their company. Thus (asyou have heard) two poore Painters of Florence, taught Master Doctorbetter Wit, then all the Learned at Bologna.
6.  Know then (most gracious assembly) that it is not many yeeres since,when there lived in Salerne, a very famous Physitian, named SignieurMazzeo della Montagna, who being already well entred into yeeres,would (neverthelesse) marrie with a beautifull young Mayden of theCity, bestowing rich garments, gaudie attyres, Ringes, and Jewelles onher, such as few Women else could any way equall, because hee lovedher most deerely. Yet being an aged man, and never remembring, howvaine and idle a thing it is, for age to make such an unfittingElection, injurious to both; and therefore endangering that domestickeagreement, which ought to be the sole and maine comfort of Marriage:it maketh me therefore to misdoubt, that as in our former Tale ofSigniour Ricciardo de Cinzica, some dayes of the Calender did hereseeme as distastefull, as those that occasioned the other Womansdiscontentment. In such unequall choyses, Parents commonly are moreblamewoorthy, then any imputation, to bee layde on the young Women,who gladdely would enjoy such as in heart they have elected: butthat their Parents, looking through the glasse of greedie lucre, doeoverthrow both their owne hopes, and the faire fortunes of theirchildren together.

应用

1.  When Beltramo was come up into his wives Chamber, hee found her castdowne upon her Couch, weeping, full of feare, and greatlydiscomforted; wherefore he said unto her, What is hee that SigniorLambertuccio is so extreamely offended withall, and threatneth in suchimplacable manner? The Lady arising from her Couch, and going neere tothe Bed, because Lionello might the better heare her; returned herHusband this answere. Husband (quoth she) never was I so dreadfullyaffrighted till now; for, a young Gentleman, of whence, or what he is,I know not, came running into our Castle for rescue, being pursuedby Signior Lambertuccio, a weapon ready drawne in his hand.Ascending up our stayres, by what fortune, I know not, he found myChamber doore standing open, finding me also working on my Sampler,and in wonderfull feare and trembling.
2.  Having found her dwelling, and (like a kinde Father) being earnestlydesirous to see her; he dayly resorted nere to the house, where SirRoger Mandevile (for so was Gianettaes husband named) chauncing to seehim, being moved to compassion, because he was both poore and aged:commaunded one of his men, to take him into the house, and to give himsome foode for Gods sake, which (accordingly) the servant performed.Gianetta had divers children by her husband, the eldest being buteight yeeres of age, yet all of them so faire and comely as couldbe. As the old Count sate eating his meate in the Hall, the childrencame all about him, embracing, hugging, and making much of him, evenas if Nature had truly instructed them, that this was their aged(though poor) Grandfather, and hee as lovingly receiving these kilderelations from them, wisely and silently kept all to himselfe, withsighes, teares, and joyes intermixed together. Insomuch that thechildren would not part from him though their Tutor and Mastercalled them often, which being tolde to their Mother, shee came foorthof the neere adjoyning Parlour, and threatned to beate them, if theywould not doe what their Maister commanded them.
3.  It came to passe, that love over-awed him in such sort, as he fellinto a violent sicknesse, and store of Physicions were sent for, tosave him from death, if possibly it might be. Their judgementsobserving the course of his sicknesse, yet not reaching to the causeof the disease, made a doubtfull question of his recovery; which wasso displeasing to his parents, that their griefe and sorrow grewbeyond measure. Many earnest entreaties they moved to him, to know theoccasion of his sickenesse, whereto he returned no other answere,but heart-breaking sighes, and incessant teares, which drew him moreand more into weakenesse of body.
4、  Seeking for that, which onely mine should be:
5、  Hereupon, the Gardiner was presently sent for, and before theJudge would depart thence, he saw the bed of Sage digged up by theroots, and found the true occasion, whereby these two poore Loverslost their lives. For, just in the middest of the bed, and at themaine roote, which directed all the Sage in growth; lay an huge mightyToad, even weltring (as it were) in a hole full of poyson; by meaneswhereof, in conjecture of the judge, and all the rest, the whole bedof Sage became envenomed, occasioning every leafe thereof to be deadlyin taste. None being so hardy, as to approach neere the Toade, theymade a pile of wood directly over it, and setting it on a flamingfire, threw all the Sage thereinto, and so they were consumedtogether. So ended all further suite in Law, concerning the deathsof Pasquino and Simonida: whose bodies being carried to the Churchof Saint Paul, by their sad and sorrowfull accusers, Strambo,Lagina, Atticciato and Malagevole, were buried together in onegoodly Monument, for a future memory of their hard Fortune.

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  • 伊凡洁 08-05

      Now, to proceede where we left, Friar Onyon having left thisserviceable youth at his lodging, to see that no bodie should meddlewith his commodities, especially his Wallet, because of the sacredthings therein contained: Guccio Imbrata, who as earnestly affected tobe in the Kitchin, as Birds to hop from branch to branch,especially, when anie of the Chamber-maides were there, espyed oneof the Hostesses Female attendants, a grosse fat Trugge, low ofstature, ill faced, and worse formed, with a paire of brests liketwo bumbards, smelling loathsomely of grease and sweate; downe sheedescended into the Kitchin, like a Kite upon a peece of Carion. ThisBoy, or Knave, chuse whither you will style him, having carelesly leftFryar Onyons Chamber doore open, and all the holy things so much to beneglected, although it was then the moneth of August, when heate is inthe highest predominance, yet hee would needs sit downe by the fire,and began to conferre with this amiable creature, who was called bythe name of Nuta.

  • 何建法 08-05

      When Sicurano heard this horrible lye, immediately shee conceived,that this was the occasion of her husbands hatred to her, and allthe hard haps which she had since suffered: whereupon, shee reputed itfor more then a mortall sinne, if such a villaine should passe withoutdue punishment. Sicurano seemed to like well this report, and grewinto such familiarity with Ambroginolo, that (by her perswasions) whenthe Fayre was ended, she tooke him higher with her into Alexandria,and all his Wares along with him, furnishing him with a fit andconvenient shop, where he made great benefite of his Merchandizes,trusting all his monies in the Captaines custody, because it was thesafest course for him, and so hee continued there with no meanecontentment.

  • 邝健廉 08-05

       The harsh and uncivill usage in her, grew very distastefull toAnastasio, and so unsufferable, that after a long time of fruitlesseservice, requited still with nothing but coy disdaine; desperateresolutions entred into his brain, and often he was minded to killhimselfe. But better thoughts supplanting those furious passions, heabstained from any such violent act; and governed by more manlyconsideration, determined, that as shee hated him, he would requiteher with the like, if he could: wherein he became altogether deceived,because as his hopes grew to a dayly decaying, yet his love enlargedit selfe more and more.

  • 方松 08-05

      When the Doctor had heard all her discourse, angry though he were,yet thus he answered with a smile. Much better had it bin, if thyfollies punishment had falne on thy selfe, that it might have paidethee with deserved repentance, upon thy Mistresses finding theesleeping. But go and get his deliverance if thou canst, with thiscaution, that if ever hereafter he be seene in my house, the perillthereof shall light on thy selfe. Receiving this answer, for her firstentrance into the attempt, and as her Mistresse had advised her, inall hast she went to the prison, where she prevailed so well withthe Jaylor, that hee granted her private conference with Ruggiero. Shehaving instructed him what he should say to the Provost, if he had anypurpose to escape with life; went thither before him to the Provost,who admitting her into his presence, and knowing that shee wasMaster Doctors Maid, a man especially respected of all the City, hewas the more willing to heare her message, he imagining that sheewas sent by her Master.

  • 王剑锋 08-04

    {  Calandrino (who was close by them) hearing these wordes, andseeing the whole manner of their wondering behaviour: becameconstantly perswaded, that hee had not onely found the precious stone;but also had some store of them about him, by reason he was so neereto them, and yet they could not see him, therefore he walked beforethem. Now was his joy beyond all compasse of expression, and beingexceedingly proud of so happy an adventure: did not meane to speakeone word to them, but (heavily laden as hee was) to steale homefaire and softly before them, which indeede he did, leaving them tofollow after, if they would. Bruno perceiving his intent, said toBuffalmaco: What remaineth now for us to doe? Why should not we gohome, as well as hee? And reason too, replyed Bruno. It is in vaine totarry any longer heere: but I solemnly protest, Calandrino shall nomore make an Asse of me: and were I now as neere him, as not longsince I was, I would give him such a remembrance on the heele withthis Flint stone, as should sticke by him this moneth, to teach hima lesson for abusing his friends.

  • 格伦瓦德 08-03

      THE TENTH DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL}

  • 蔡东家 08-03

      I see, I heare, and feele a kinde of blisse,

  • 马耀飞 08-03

      DECLARING WHAT AN HONOURABLE VERTUE COURTESIE IS, IN THEM

  • 吴志强 08-02

       To decke up their Bowers,

  • 郭仁成 07-31

    {  Love, if I can scape free, etc.

  • 邝凝丹 07-31

      And death (as yet) being deafe to all his earnest imprecations,delayed him on in lingering afflictions: and continuing still insuch an extreame condition, he was advised by some of his bestfriends, utterly to abstaine from this fond pursuit, because his hopeswere meerely in vaine, and Madam Catulla prized nothing moreprecious to her in the World, then unstayned loyaltie to herHusband: and yet shee lived in such extreame jealousie of him, asfearing least some bird flying in the ayre should snatch him from her.

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