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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:白麟坂 大小:h0a6f8aN75969KB 下载:2VZOw4FL63970次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:VHAKGSIn32342条
日期:2020-08-07 03:38:42
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阎揆要

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Penelope then spoke to him. "Antinous," said she, "it is not rightthat you should ill-treat any guest of Telemachus who comes to thishouse. If the stranger should prove strong enough to string the mightybow of Ulysses, can you suppose that he would take me home with himand make me his wife? Even the man himself can have no such idea inhis mind: none of you need let that disturb his feasting; it wouldbe out of all reason."
2.  And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."
3.  They put on their armour as fast as they could- that is to sayUlysses, his three men, and the six sons of Dolius. Laertes also andDolius did the same- warriors by necessity in spite of their greyhair. When they had all put on their armour, they opened the gateand sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way.
4.  He then took off his armour and gave it to Eumaeus and Philoetius,who went straight on to the house, while he turned off into thevineyard to make trial of his father. As he went down into the greatorchard, he did not see Dolius, nor any of his sons nor of the otherbondsmen, for they were all gathering thorns to make a fence for thevineyard, at the place where the old man had told them; he thereforefound his father alone, hoeing a vine. He had on a dirty old shirt,patched and very shabby; his legs were bound round with thongs ofoxhide to save him from the brambles, and he also wore sleeves ofleather; he had a goat skin cap on his head, and was looking verywoe-begone. When Ulysses saw him so worn, so old and full of sorrow,he stood still under a tall pear tree and began to weep. He doubtedwhether to embrace him, kiss him, and tell him all about his havingcome home, or whether he should first question him and see what hewould say. In the end he deemed it best to be crafty with him, so inthis mind he went up to his father, who was bending down and diggingabout a plant.
5.  "Poor wretch," said she, "are you gone clean out of your mind? Goand sleep in some smithy, or place of public gossips, instead ofchattering here. Are you not ashamed of opening your mouth before yourbetters- so many of them too? Has the wine been getting into yourhead, or do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lostyour wits because you beat the tramp Irus; take care that a better manthan he does not come and cudgel you about the head till he pack youbleeding out of the house."
6.  "Ulysses, who was as crafty as he was valiant, hit upon thefollowing plan:

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1.  "'Look here, Cyclops,' said I, you have been eating a great dealof man's flesh, so take this and drink some wine, that you may seewhat kind of liquor we had on board my ship. I was bringing it toyou as a drink-offering, in the hope that you would take compassionupon me and further me on my way home, whereas all you do is to goon ramping and raving most intolerably. You ought to be ashamedyourself; how can you expect people to come see you any more if youtreat them in this way?'
2.  When he had said this, he seated himself beside Alcinous. Supper wasthen served, and the wine was mixed for drinking. A servant led in thefavourite bard Demodocus, and set him in the midst of the company,near one of the bearing-posts supporting the cloister, that he mightlean against it. Then Ulysses cut off a piece of roast pork withplenty of fat (for there was abundance left on the joint) and saidto a servant, "Take this piece of pork over to Demodocus and tellhim to eat it; for all the pain his lays may cause me I will salutehim none the less; bards are honoured and respected throughout theworld, for the muse teaches them their songs and loves them."
3.  "But Polyphemus shouted to them from inside the cave, 'Noman iskilling me by fraud! Noman is killing me by force!'
4.  As he spoke he placed the sword in the hands of Ulysses and said,"Good luck to you, father stranger; if anything has been said amissmay the winds blow it away with them, and may heaven grant you asafe return, for I understand you have been long away from home, andhave gone through much hardship."
5.  "Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
6.  This was how they talked. But Telemachus went down into the loftyand spacious store-room where his father's treasure of gold and bronzelay heaped up upon the floor, and where the linen and spare clotheswere kept in open chests. Here, too, there was a store of fragrantolive oil, while casks of old, well-ripened wine, unblended and fitfor a god to drink, were ranged against the wall in case Ulyssesshould come home again after all. The room was closed with well-madedoors opening in the middle; moreover the faithful old house-keeperEuryclea, daughter of Ops the son of Pisenor, was in charge ofeverything both night and day. Telemachus called her to the store-roomand said:

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1.  "There I tried to land, but could not, for it was a bad place andthe waves dashed me against the rocks, so I again took to the seaand swam on till I came to a river that seemed the most likely landingplace, for there were no rocks and it was sheltered from the wind.Here, then, I got out of the water and gathered my senses togetheragain. Night was coming on, so I left the river, and went into athicket, where I covered myself all over with leaves, and presentlyheaven sent me off into a very deep sleep. Sick and sorry as I was Islept among the leaves all night, and through the next day tillafternoon, when I woke as the sun was westering, and saw yourdaughter's maid servants playing upon the beach, and your daughteramong them looking like a goddess. I besought her aid, and sheproved to be of an excellent disposition, much more so than could beexpected from so young a person- for young people are apt to bethoughtless. She gave me plenty of bread and wine, and when she hadhad me washed in the river she also gave me the clothes in which yousee me. Now, therefore, though it has pained me to do so, I havetold you the whole truth."
2.  Here poor Ulysses would have certainly perished even in spite of hisown destiny, if Minerva had not helped him to keep his wits about him.He swam seaward again, beyond reach of the surf that was beatingagainst the land, and at the same time he kept looking towards theshore to see if he could find some haven, or a spit that should takethe waves aslant. By and by, as he swam on, he came to the mouth ofa river, and here he thought would be the best place, for there wereno rocks, and it afforded shelter from the wind. He felt that therewas a current, so he prayed inwardly and said:
3.  "Stranger," said he, "how suddenly you have changed from what youwere a moment or two ago. You are dressed differently and yourcolour is not the same. Are you some one or other of the gods thatlive in heaven? If so, be propitious to me till I can make you duesacrifice and offerings of wrought gold. Have mercy upon me."
4.  As he spoke he went on board, and bade the others do so also andloose the hawsers, so they took their places in the ship. ButTelemachus bound on his sandals, and took a long and doughty spearwith a head of sharpened bronze from the deck of the ship. Then theyloosed the hawsers, thrust the ship off from land, and made on towardsthe city as they had been told to do, while Telemachus strode on asfast as he could, till he reached the homestead where his countlessherds of swine were feeding, and where dwelt the excellentswineherd, who was so devoted a servant to his master.
5.   'Son-in-law and daughter," replied Autolycus, "call the childthus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in oneplace and another, both men and women; so name the child 'Ulysses,' orthe child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother'sfamily on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him apresent and will send him on his way rejoicing."
6.  While he was thus in two minds Helen came down from her high vaultedand perfumed room, looking as lovely as Diana herself. Adraste broughther a seat, Alcippe a soft woollen rug while Phylo fetched her thesilver work-box which Alcandra wife of Polybus had given her.Polybus lived in Egyptian Thebes, which is the richest city in thewhole world; he gave Menelaus two baths, both of pure silver, twotripods, and ten talents of gold; besides all this, his wife gaveHelen some beautiful presents, to wit, a golden distaff, and asilver work-box that ran on wheels, with a gold band round the topof it. Phylo now placed this by her side, full of fine spun yarn,and a distaff charged with violet coloured wool was laid upon thetop of it. Then Helen took her seat, put her feet upon thefootstool, and began to question her husband.

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1.  When Menelaus heard this he immediately told his wife and servantsto prepare a sufficient dinner from what there might be in thehouse. At this moment Eteoneus joined him, for he lived close by andhad just got up; so Menelaus told him to light the fire and cooksome meat, which he at once did. Then Menelaus went down into hisfragrant store room, not alone, but Helen went too, withMegapenthes. When he reached the place where the treasures of hishouse were kept, he selected a double cup, and told his sonMegapenthes to bring also a silver mixing-bowl. Meanwhile Helen wentto the chest where she kept the lovely dresses which she had made withher own hands, and took out one that was largest and mostbeautifully enriched with embroidery; it glittered like a star, andlay at the very bottom of the chest. Then they all came back throughthe house again till they got to Telemachus, and Menelaus said,"Telemachus, may Jove, the mighty husband of Juno, bring you safelyhome according to your desire. I will now present you with thefinest and most precious piece of plate in all my house. It is amixing-bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold,and it is the work of Vulcan. Phaedimus king of the Sidonians mademe a present of it in the course of a visit that I paid him while Iwas on my return home. I should like to give it to you."
2.  In the end he deemed it best to take to the woods, and he foundone upon some high ground not far from the water. There he creptbeneath two shoots of olive that grew from a single stock- the onean ungrafted sucker, while the other had been grafted. No wind,however squally, could break through the cover they afforded, norcould the sun's rays pierce them, nor the rain get through them, soclosely did they grow into one another. Ulysses crept under theseand began to make himself a bed to lie on, for there was a greatlitter of dead leaves lying about- enough to make a covering for twoor three men even in hard winter weather. He was glad enough to seethis, so he laid himself down and heaped the leaves all round him.Then, as one who lives alone in the country, far from any neighbor,hides a brand as fire-seed in the ashes to save himself from having toget a light elsewhere, even so did Ulysses cover himself up withleaves; and Minerva shed a sweet sleep upon his eyes, closed hiseyelids, and made him lose all memories of his sorrows.
3.  And Ulysses answered, "I understand and heed. Go in first andleave me here where I am. I am quite used to being beaten and havingthings thrown at me. I have been so much buffeted about in war andby sea that I am case-hardened, and this too may go with the rest. Buta man cannot hide away the cravings of a hungry belly; this is anenemy which gives much trouble to all men; it is because of thisthat ships are fitted out to sail the seas, and to make war upon otherpeople."
4、  "Cease your weeping, lest some one should come outside and see us,and tell those who a are within. When you go in, do so separately, notboth together; I will go first, and do you follow afterwards; Let thismoreover be the token between us; the suitors will all of them tryto prevent me from getting hold of the bow and quiver; do you,therefore, Eumaeus, place it in my hands when you are carrying itabout, and tell the women to close the doors of their apartment. Ifthey hear any groaning or uproar as of men fighting about the house,they must not come out; they must keep quiet, and stay where theyare at their work. And I charge you, Philoetius, to make fast thedoors of the outer court, and to bind them securely at once."
5、  When she had thus spoken, she flew away in the form of an eagle, andall marvelled as they beheld it. Nestor was astonished, and tookTelemachus by the hand. "My friend," said he, "I see that you aregoing to be a great hero some day, since the gods wait upon you thuswhile you are still so young. This can have been none other of thosewho dwell in heaven than Jove's redoubtable daughter, theTrito-born, who showed such favour towards your brave father among theArgives." "Holy queen," he continued, "vouchsafe to send down thygrace upon myself, my good wife, and my children. In return, I willoffer you in sacrifice a broad-browed heifer of a year old,unbroken, and never yet brought by man under the yoke. I will gild herhorns, and will offer her up to you in sacrifice."

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  • 刘宾 08-06

      "Thence we sailed sadly on, glad to have escaped death, though wehad lost our comrades, and came to the Aeaean island, where Circelives a great and cunning goddess who is own sister to the magicianAeetes- for they are both children of the sun by Perse, who isdaughter to Oceanus. We brought our ship into a safe harbour without aword, for some god guided us thither, and having landed we there fortwo days and two nights, worn out in body and mind. When the morningof the third day came I took my spear and my sword, and went away fromthe ship to reconnoitre, and see if I could discover signs of humanhandiwork, or hear the sound of voices. Climbing to the top of ahigh look-out I espied the smoke of Circe's house rising upwardsamid a dense forest of trees, and when I saw this I doubted whether,having seen the smoke, I would not go on at once and find out more,but in the end I deemed it best to go back to the ship, give the mentheir dinners, and send some of them instead of going myself.

  • 寇建刚 08-06

      On this the swineherd led the way into the hut and bade him sitdown. He strewed a good thick bed of rushes upon the floor, and on thetop of this he threw the shaggy chamois skin- a great thick one- onwhich he used to sleep by night. Ulysses was pleased at being madethus welcome, and said "May Jove, sir, and the rest of the godsgrant you your heart's desire in return for the kind way in whichyou have received me."

  • 德哈 08-06

       To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."

  • 塞纳-马恩省 08-06

      Thus did they converse, and they had only a very little time leftfor sleep, for it was soon daybreak. In the meantime Telemachus andhis crew were nearing land, so they loosed the sails, took down themast, and rowed the ship into the harbour. They cast out their mooringstones and made fast the hawsers; they then got out upon the seashore, mixed their wine, and got dinner ready. As soon as they had hadenough to eat and drink Telemachus said, "Take the ship on to thetown, but leave me here, for I want to look after the herdsmen onone of my farms. In the evening, when I have seen all I want, I willcome down to the city, and to-morrow morning in return for yourtrouble I will give you all a good dinner with meat and wine."

  • 奥尼 08-05

    {  With these words he scared the women, and they went off into thebody of the house. They trembled all aver, for they thought he woulddo as he said. But Ulysses took his stand near the burning braziers,holding up torches and looking at the people- brooding the while onthings that should surely come to pass.

  • 阿纳纳 08-04

      And in like manner Eumaeus prayed that Ulysses might return home.}

  • 余华 08-04

      "Hear me, men of Ithaca, and I speak more particularly to thesuitors, for I see mischief brewing for them. Ulysses is not goingto be away much longer; indeed he is close at hand to deal out deathand destruction, not on them alone, but on many another of us who livein Ithaca. Let us then be wise in time, and put a stop to thiswickedness before he comes. Let the suitors do so of their own accord;it will be better for them, for I am not prophesying without dueknowledge; everything has happened to Ulysses as I foretold when theArgives set out for Troy, and he with them. I said that after goingthrough much hardship and losing all his men he should come home againin the twentieth year and that no one would know him; and now all thisis coming true."

  • 王晓全 08-04

      Ulysses answered, "Laodamas, why do you taunt me in this way? mymind is set rather on cares than contests; I have been throughinfinite trouble, and am come among you now as a suppliant, prayingyour king and people to further me on my return home."

  • 边仁善 08-03

       And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."

  • 卡特彼勒 08-01

    {  "Goddess," answered Ulysses, "all that you have said is true, butI am in some doubt as to how I shall be able to kill these wickedsuitors single handed, seeing what a number of them there alwaysare. And there is this further difficulty, which is still moreconsiderable. Supposing that with Jove's and your assistance I succeedin killing them, I must ask you to consider where I am to escape tofrom their avengers when it is all over."

  • 华斌 08-01

      "This hound," answered Eumaeus, "belonged to him who has died in afar country. If he were what he was when Ulysses left for Troy, hewould soon show you what he could do. There was not a wild beast inthe forest that could get away from him when he was once on itstracks. But now he has fallen on evil times, for his master is deadand gone, and the women take no care of him. Servants never do theirwork when their master's hand is no longer over them, for Jove takeshalf the goodness out of a man when he makes a slave of him."

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